Tristan Harris And “The Social Dilemma:” Big Ideas To Fix Our Social Media Ills

Somehow, it figures that an online media and technology conference would be dogged by tech problems when its opening keynote featured social-media critic Tristan Harris. But that’s exactly what happened in today’s NYC Media Lab Summit, which eventually opened with Harris’ truncated conversation about hit Netflix
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documentary The Social Dilemma, followed by a panel of tech-sector and journalism critics discussing “Big Ideas” to fix both industries.

“So this is ironic on a whole bunch of levels,” said host Steve Rosenbaum, managing director of the NYC Media Lab, after the Harris talk finally started 20 minutes late.

Harris, head of the Center for Humane Technology and a former Google
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design ethicist, has become a prominent critic of the ways social-media companies harvest and profit from user data, abuse their market power, and encourage self-reinforcing information bubbles that lead to extremist positions.

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SAP pledges to spend more on social, diverse businesses



FILE PHOTO: SAP logo at SAP headquarters in Walldorf


© Reuters/Ralph Orlowski
FILE PHOTO: SAP logo at SAP headquarters in Walldorf


BERLIN (Reuters) – SAP will try to allocate 5% of its procurement spending to social enterprises and diverse businesses by 2025 to encourage greater social and environmental responsibility.

The German software group, which has 440,000 clients, appealed on Tuesday to other companies to join it in supporting small businesses owned and run by women or minorities.

SAP’s procurement initiative follows its launch in June of a product to help firms track greenhouse gas emissions in supply chains, backing a view that being transparent about their carbon footprint will be good for business.

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The new initiative relates to so-called addressable spend, the share of a company’s procurement budget that can be allocated to social

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Social media’s Trump-Covid conundrum – POLITICO

Editor’s Note: Morning Tech is a free version of POLITICO Pro Technology’s morning newsletter, which is delivered to our subscribers each morning at 6 a.m. The POLITICO Pro platform combines the news you need with tools you can use to take action on the day’s biggest stories. Act on the news with POLITICO Pro.

— On Trump’s Covid diagnosis: Lawmakers and celebrities blasted Twitter and Facebook for swiftly cracking down on posts wishing harm on the president after years of doing little to address the death threats endured by women and minorities.

— 2020 watch: Less than a month from Election Day, down-ballot candidates face the same disinformation threats as those vying for the Oval Office. How are tech and election-tech companies responding?

— On the calendar this week: The much-anticipated House antitrust report. A (hopefully more functional) vice presidential debate. Opening arguments in Google v. Oracle — and more.

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CEOs of 3 social media giants to testify at Senate hearing

The hearing “must be constructive and focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections,” Twitter said in a tweet in its policy channel.

The hearing will come less than a week before Election Day. It marks a new bipartisan initiative against Big Tech companies, which have been under increasing scrutiny in Washington and from state attorneys general over issues of competition, consumer privacy and hate speech.

The executives’ testimony is needed “to reveal the extent of influence that their companies have over American speech during a critical time in our democratic process,” said Sen. Roger Wicker, a Mississippi Republican who heads the Commerce Committee.

Facebook, meanwhile, is expanding restrictions on political advertising, including new bans on messages claiming widespread voter fraud. The new prohibitions laid out in a blog post came days after President Donald Trump raised the prospect of mass fraud

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Facebook calls Netflix documentary ‘The Social Dilemma’ sensationalist

  • Facebook released a blog post on Friday attacking the Netflix documentary “The Social Dilemma.”
  • Facebook said the film buries nuanced discussion in “sensationalism” and uses social media platforms as a scapegoat for complex societal problems like political polarization.
  • Oxford University psychologist Prof. Andrew Przybylski told Business Insider he broadly agreed with Facebook’s argument.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook is taking on a Netflix documentary about the dark side of social media, saying it buries the truth in sensationalism.

“The Social Dilemma” started streaming on Netflix on September 9, and Facebook put out a blog post on Friday addressing the film. “We should have conversations about the impact of social media on our lives. But ‘The Social Dilemma’ buries the substance in sensationalism,” Facebook writes.

“Rather than offer a nuanced look at technology, it gives a distorted view of how social media platforms work to create a convenient

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Social dilemmas about protective measures — ScienceDaily

We need to know about these psychological and social profiles so we can understand how protective actions against contagious diseases are adopted, and then define the correct preventive approaches. At the very start of the coronavirus crisis — before restrictive measures were taken — a team of health behaviour specialists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) managed to collect a large amount of data about the adoption of protective measures.

Through a study published in the journal Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, the Geneva psychologists analysed how people in Britain followed the precautions recommended in their country. The study focuses on how the behaviour of others influences individual decision-making, known as the social dilemma. It notes that beliefs about COVID-19, such as thinking that the disease is dangerous or feelings of vulnerability, have little impact on whether or not an individual takes up protective measures. The people least likely

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Thank you for posting: Smoking’s lessons for regulating social media

Day by day, the evidence is mounting that Facebook is bad for society. Last week Channel 4 News in London tracked down Black Americans in Wisconsin who were targeted by President Trump’s 2016 campaign with negative advertising about Hillary Clinton—“deterrence” operations to suppress their vote.

A few weeks ago, meanwhile, I was included in a discussion organized by the Computer History Museum, called Decoding the Election. A fellow panelist, Hillary Clinton’s former campaign manager Robby Mook, described how Facebook worked closely with the Trump campaign. Mook refused to have Facebook staff embedded inside Clinton’s campaign because it did not seem ethical, while Trump’s team welcomed the opportunity to have an insider turn the knobs on the social network’s targeted advertising. 

Taken together, these two pieces of information are damning for the future of American democracy; Trump’s team openly marked 3.5 million Black Americans for deterrence in their data set, while

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With Blackstone’s backing, Murka stakes a claim in social casino games

In the saturated social casino game market, it isn’t easy to battle the big brands. But that’s the challenge that Murka, a smaller player in Ukraine, has undertaken with some success. Through growth that accelerated this year, Murka has become a top 10 player with five million monthly active users.

While it still has a tiny share of the $6.2 billion social casino game market, Murka has grown 40% this year as users play more during the pandemic, partly because its slot machine games are more like role-playing games.

Over a decade, the Kyiv, Ukraine-based company has emerged from a small startup to more than 550 employees across five offices. It was acquired last year by mega investor Blackstone Group, a private equity firm. Blackstone also owns casino properties such as The Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas as well as Vungle, a performance marketing firm. Blackstone’s revenues last year were $7.3

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Parler, social media Proud Boys use, saw use spike during Trump debate

  • Parler, an app popular with Trump supporters and the extremist Proud Boys group, said its activity tripled during the debate where Trump mentioned the group.
  • Parler markets itself heavily on its lack of content moderation, and is used by many who, like the Proud Boys, are banned from other sites.
  • A spokeswoman told Business Insider its activity tripled during and after the debate, and it had 266,000 active users in that period.
  • Trump refused to condemn white supremacy during his first debate with Joe Biden, saying instead: “Proud Boys, stand back and stand by.”
  • The Proud Boys celebrated Trump’s comment by creating merchandise and using it as a recruitment drive.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Parler, a social media platform popular with Trump supporters and used by the Proud Boys, said its activity rose to three times its normal levels during the debate in which Trump mentioned the

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BISD, Facebook investigating social media threat against teacher

Beaumont ISD Police are investigating after a number of threats were sent to a teacher through anonymous Facebook accounts demanding them to “stop sending work.”

BISD spokesperson Hannah LeTulle confirmed that the district was investigating the matter, but did not provide additional details.

“The district takes any and all threats seriously and is doing so in this situation,” LeTulle said in a statement to The Enterprise, “The matter is under current investigation with the BISD Police Department.”

The messages were sent from at least three separate accounts with fake names including a character from the cartoon “Naruto,” and another with a phrase tied the hacking activist group Anonymous.


A Facebook spokesperson said the accounts have been deactivated for violating the social network’s policies prohibiting fake accounts, and that the company is investigating the matter.

None of the accounts had profile pictures or “about” information prior to their deactivation.

In one

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