Satellite imagery from space agencies sought in search for missing Belle Isle woman

ORLANDO, Fla. – The family of a missing Belle Isle woman made a plea Tuesday for space agencies to provide satellite imagery as the search continues for Stephanie Hollingsworth.

There’s a $10,000 reward for information leading to Hollingsworth, who was last seen Sept. 25 at a Walmart shopping center at 5991 S. Goldenrod Road in Orlando.

Hollingsworth’s husband, Scott, and other family members held a news conference, along with Bill Moore, a retired Orlando police detective, who shared details about emerging technologies they want to use to help find Stephanie Hollingsworth’s 2000 Chevrolet Tahoe.

Moore said they’re seeking help from NASA, SpaceX, L3Harris Technologies, Microsoft, Amazon and Geospatial Enthusiasts.

“We can get lucky to have a satellite passing overhead to capture her either walking to the car or the car leaving that parking space,” Moore said. “The family requests the assistance of any corporation or individual to search stored satellite

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Cyber Command has sought to disrupt the world’s largest botnet, hoping to reduce its potential impact on the election

The effort is part of what Gen. Paul Nakasone, the head of Cyber Command, calls “persistent engagement,” or the imposition of cumulative costs on an adversary by keeping them constantly engaged. And that is a key feature of CyberCom’s activities to help protect the election against foreign threats, officials said.

“Right now, my top priority is for a safe, secure, and legitimate 2020 election,” Nakasone said in August in a set of written responses to Washington Post questions. “The Department of Defense, and Cyber Command specifically, are supporting a broader ‘whole-of-government’ approach to secure our elections.”

Trickbot is malware that can steal financial data and drop other malicious software onto infected systems. Cyber criminals have used it to install ransomware, a particularly nasty form of malware that encrypts users’ data and for which the criminals then demand payment — usually in cryptocurrency — to unlock.

Brian Krebs, who writes the

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