Veritone Licensing Expands Global News Library with Exclusive Agreement with the South China Morning Post

New agreement adds SCMP’s international news content dating back over 100 years to the Veritone content licensing portfolio

Veritone, Inc. (Nasdaq: VERI), the creator of the world’s first operating system for artificial intelligence, aiWARE™, and provider of digital content licensing services on behalf of the world’s premier sports entities, news organizations and user-generated networks, today announced a new agreement with South China Morning Post, a leading global news company that has reported on China and Asia for more than a century.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005137/en/

Veritone Licensing signs exclusive agreement with the South China Morning Post to expands its global news library. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The agreement gives Veritone the exclusive rights to license SCMP’s archive and current video content to its clients in North America. The deal is a significant milestone in Veritone’s strategy to further expand the global reach of its

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South Korea pushes for AI semiconductors as global demand grows

The South Korean government has made no secret of its ambition to be a key player in the global artificial intelligence industry, including making the semiconductors powering AI functionalities.

This week, the country’s information and communications technology regulator announced plans to develop up to 50 types of AI -focused system semiconductors by 2030, Yonhap News Agency reported. The government will be on the hunt for thousands of local experts to lead the new wave of innovation.

South Korean has made several promises to support next-generation chip companies in recent times. Earlier this year, for example, it announced plans to spend about 1 trillion won ($870 million) on AI chips commercialization and production before 2029. Last year, President Moon Jae-in announced his “Presidential Initiative for AI” to raise public awareness on the industry.

These efforts come amid growing demand for AI-related chips, which, by McKinsey estimates, could account for almost 20%

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South Texas Workforce Solutions hosting annual hiring event for veterans

With Veterans Day coming up Nov. 11, Workforce Solutions for South Texas is preparing an event to assist veterans with the “Hiring Red, White & You” job fair scheduled for Nov. 5.

The event will help veterans find jobs and transition from service live into the civilian workforce. Spouses of veterans are also encouraged to participate.

“Our veterans give their all to serve our country, and we are all indebted to them for their service,” Workforce Solutions for South Texas Executive Director Rogelio G. Treviño said. “We at Workforce Solutions for South Texas are honored to be able to provide this ‘Red, White & You’ hiring event as a token or our appreciation and to help our veterans and their families obtain meaningful, good paying career jobs.”

Workforce Solutions said the ninth annual edition of the event is needed now more than ever due to the pandemic.


The event is

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South Bay teen author shares love of coding through books

In “The Code Detectives,” two middle school girls who love coding use artificial intelligence to solve mysteries. For 17-year-old author Ria Dosha, writing the book series is a way to advocate for increasing diversity within the technology field.

“I’ve brought a diverse cast of characters to life, with the series centering around Ramona Diaz, a powerful young girl of color,” says Ria, a student at Cupertino’s Monta Vista High School. “The book series gives young girls strong, fictional role models in technology and AI, and introduces them to AI topics in a compelling way, clearing common misconceptions.”

Ria writes what shoe knows, and vice versa. She is the founder of CodeBuddies, which uses workshops, panels, challenges and more to promote problem-solving through technology. She is also the founder of Monta Vista’s Women in AI club, where she teaches girls the impact of artificial intelligence in daily life.

Her work has

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Nearly Half of South America’s Mammals Came from North America, New Research May Explain Why | Smart News

North and South America haven’t always been connected. South America functioned as a continent-sized island for millions of years following the extinction of the dinosaurs, incubating its own strange assembly of animals such as giant ground sloths, massive armored mammals akin to armadillos and saber-toothed marsupial carnivores. Meanwhile, North America was exchanging animals with Asia, populating it with the ancestors of modern horses, camels and cats, writes Asher Elbein for the New York Times.

Finally, when tectonic activity formed the Isthmus of Panama roughly ten million years ago, a massive biological exchange took place. The many species that had been evolving in isolation from one another on both continents began migrating across the narrow new land bridge. Llamas, raccoons, wolves and bears trekked south, while armadillos, possums and porcupines went north.

It would be reasonable to expect this grand biological and geological event, known to paleontologists as the Great

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Climate patterns linked in Amazon, North and South America, study shows

amazon rainforest
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

University of Arkansas researchers have established a link between climate patterns in the Amazon and large parts of North and South America using their newly developed tree-ring chronology from the Amazon River basin.


The discovery helps researchers better understand large-scale climate extremes and the impact of the El Niño phenomenon.

Tree growth is a well-established climate proxy. By comparing growth rings in Cedrela odorata trees found in the Rio Paru watershed of the eastern Amazon River with hundreds of similar chronologies in North and South America, scientists have shown an inverse relationship in tree growth, and therefore precipitation patterns, between the areas. Drought in the Amazon is correlated with wetness in the southwestern United States, Mexico and Patagonia, and vice versa.

The process is driven by the El Niño phenomenon, which influences surface-level winds along the equator, researchers said. El Niño is the name given to

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South Korea launches antitrust probe into Google

South Korea has launched an antitrust probe into Google over its plan to enforce its 30-percent Play Store commission by disallowing any apps circumventing its payment system, a top official said Thursday.

Google has always required apps offered on the Play Store’s virtual shelves to use its payment system, which takes an industry-standard 30 percent cut — the same as Apple does.

The company has been lax about enforcing the rule, however, unlike Apple — which is currently involved in a legal battle with the owners of the Fortnite game series after banning the app when developers allowed users to circumvent the payment system.

The internet giant said last month the new policy — set to take effect next year — applies to fewer than three percent of developers with apps in the Play Store.

But the announcement prompted a backlash from South Korean app developers, who say the new

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What Happened to South America’s Missing Mega-Mammals?

Millions of years before humans set foot in the Americas, a rush of alien animals began arriving in South America.

As the Isthmus of Panama came up from the waves, bridging the North and South American continents, llamas, raccoons, wolves, bears and many other species headed south. At the same time, the ancestors of armadillos, possums and porcupines headed north.

Paleontologists call the event the Great American Interchange. But they’ve long been puzzled by one aspect of it: Why did the majority of mammal immigrants go south, rather than the other way around? What happened to the southern mammals?

After a detailed analysis of fossil data from both continents, a group of researchers think they have an answer: a nasty extinction event struck South American mammals during the interchange, leaving fewer of them available to head north. Their research was published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of

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The best company in South Africa to build a smartphone app for your company

Many South African companies are looking to improve their operations through mobile apps, but it can be a daunting task to design and build a world-class app.

Good news is that there is a company which specializes in Android and iOS app development which can help – Codehesion.

Codehesion is South Africa’s top mobile app developer and has helped many companies launch their own apps.

Codehesion takes care of everything when providing a business with a new smartphone app, including the planning, design, build, and launch.

Their app developers also help with the strategy around the app, provide advice on which features to include, and list the app on the Android and iOS app stores.

Additionally, Codehesion CEO Hector Beyers said their experience helps them guide clients on which type of app will work best for their business.

Risk-free consultation

Codehesion offers South African businesses a free and easy

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Discovery of diamonds in small rock sample hints at possibility of new deposits in area similar to world’s richest gold mine in South Africa — ScienceDaily

The presence of diamonds in an outcrop atop an unrealized gold deposit in Canada’s Far North mirrors the association found above the world’s richest gold mine, according to University of Alberta research that fills in blanks about the thermal conditions of Earth’s crust three billion years ago.

“The diamonds we have found so far are small and not economic, but they occur in ancient sediments that are an exact analog of the world’s biggest gold deposit — the Witwatersrand Goldfields of South Africa, which has produced more than 40 per cent of the gold ever mined on Earth,” said Graham Pearson, researcher in the Faculty of Science and Canada Excellence Research Chair Laureate in Arctic Resources.

“Diamonds and gold are very strange bedfellows. They hardly ever appear in the same rock, so this new find may help to sweeten the attractiveness of the original gold discovery if we can find

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