New ‘mini-moon’ set to be captured by Earth might just be space junk



This article, New ‘mini-moon’ set to be captured by Earth might just be space junk, originally appeared on CNET.com.

We’ve got one huge moon looming overhead and you might think “that’s enough moons.” But sometimes, Earth gets greedy and starts pulling in small asteroids for extended stays in orbit. The brief visitations by these “mini-moons” are fairly rare, with only two confirmed so far. The most recent came on Feb. 15, when tiny rock 2020 CD3 was discovered by astronomers at the

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NASA chief warns Congress about Chinese space station

A Long March 5B rocket lifts off from the Wenchang launch site on China's southern in May; Chinese state media reported the &quo
A Long March 5B rocket lifts off from the Wenchang launch site on China’s southern in May; Chinese state media reported the “successful” launch, a major test of its ambitions to operate a permanent space station and send astronauts to the Moon

NASA chief Jim Bridenstine told lawmakers Wednesday it was crucial for the US to maintain a presence in Earth’s orbit after the International Space Station is decommissioned so that China does not gain a strategic advantage.


The first parts of the ISS were launched in 1998 and it has been continuously lived in since 2000.

The station, which serves as a space science lab and is a partnership between the US, Russia, Japan, Europe and Canada, is currently expected to be operated until 2030.

“I’ll tell you one thing that has me very concerned—and that is that a day is coming when the International Space Station comes to

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Space Force, DoD agencies, NRO try to get on the same page on future acquisitions

A “program integration council” run by the Space and Missile Systems Center will include representatives from DoD space-buying agencies and the National Reconnaissance Office.

WASHINGTON — The Space Force announced in June that one of its major field organizations will be an acquisition command that will unify the current mishmash of agencies that handle space programs.

The new organization, the Space Systems Command, has not yet been stood up. In the meantime, representatives from several space buying agencies will be meeting regularly in an informal “program integration council” led by the Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center.

“We want to make sure that there’s alignment across programs,” Col. Dennis Bythewood, the Space and Missile Systems Center’s director of special programs, told SpaceNews in an interview.

The integration council is run by the Space and Missile Systems Center. It includes representatives from agencies that operate independently from the Space Force

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ISS Moves To Avoid Space Debris

Astronauts on the International Space Station carried out an “avoidance maneuver” Tuesday to ensure they would not be hit by a piece of debris, said US space agency NASA, urging better management of objects in Earth’s orbit.

Russian and US flight controllers worked together during a two-and-a-half-minute operation to adjust the station’s orbit and move further away, avoiding collision.

The debris passed within about 1.4 kilometers (nearly one mile) of the ISS, NASA said.

The International Space Station -- seen here on August 26, 2020 -- is performing a maneuver to ensure it gets out of the way of a piece of space debris The International Space Station — seen here on August 26, 2020 — is performing a maneuver to ensure it gets out of the way of a piece of space debris Photo: NASA / Handout

The three crew members — two Russians and an American — relocated to be near their Soyuz spacecraft as the maneuver began so they could evacuate if necessary, NASA said, adding that the precaution was taken “out of an abundance of caution.”

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House Science Bills on Space Weather and Election Technology Pass the House

House Science Bills on Space Weather and Election Technology Pass the House

Press Release
From: House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020

House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Ranking Member Frank Lucas praised the passage of two bipartisan Committee bills today on space weather and election technology. 

S.881, the Promoting Research and Observations of Space Weather to Improve the Forecasting of Tomorrow Act, more commonly referred to as the PROSWIFT Act, improves our ability to monitor and forecast space weather. Space weather is generated by magnetic activity on the Sun and can affect technologies on Earth ranging from cell phone communications to GPS navigation to the electric grid. The bill includes an amendment by Lucas to create a pilot program that will ensure that emerging private sector companies have a seat at the table and will be able to provide monitoring and forecast data which
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NASA, US Space Force Establish Foundation for Broad Collaboration

NASA, US Space Force Establish Foundation for Broad Collaboration

PR Newswire

WASHINGTON, Sept. 22, 2020

WASHINGTON, Sept. 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — While advancing plans for unprecedented lunar exploration under the Artemis program, NASA also is building on a longstanding partnership with the Department of Defense with a new memorandum of understanding announced today by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and U.S. Space Force (USSF) Chief of Space Operations Gen. John “Jay” Raymond.

NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)
NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)

The agreement, discussed during a Sept. 22 Mitchell Institute virtual event, commits the two organizations to broad collaboration in areas including human spaceflight, U.S. space policy, space transportation, standards and best practices for safe operations in space, scientific research, and planetary defense.

“NASA’s partnerships are vital to ensuring America continues to lead the world in the peaceful uses of outer space,” Bridenstine said. “This agreement with the U.S. Space Force reaffirms and continues

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Why now is the most exciting time in space in 50 years

The essential parts of an economy are intertwined by their very nature. There’s no point in having a food market if there are no farmers to supply food. But there’s no point in growing food until there are markets where you can sell it. And what is the right moment to go into the “food transportation” business, carting the freshly harvested produce from the field to the store? We’ve seen this in our own era: What was the point in creating high-speed internet service if there was no content online that required such speeds? Why bother creating YouTube if no one has the bandwidth to watch and upload videos easily?

This is exactly the moment we’re in with human space travel. Why bother creating the technology to launch people into space when there’s nowhere in particular to go? But why create destinations in space when there’s no affordable way to

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What’s New in Aerospace Technology Space?

Technology is increasingly impacting the domain of aerospace.  

FREMONT, CA: The aerospace industry has been seeing a huge number of drifts and trends that technology has brought about. The countless innovations have further caused the crests of progress for the industry to celebrate. While the aerospace technologists are looking to walk towards fruition, the modern market is only broadening the horizon. Read on to know more about it.

In this modern era, almost all the industrial realms are centering their attempts and efforts on going green and preserving the integrity of the environment. In the wake of the mission of the aerospace technology being to modernize the parable of ecological sustainability, the trend of zero fuel is gaining a lot of traction. The idea of reducing the amount of fuel that is used to pilot an aircraft or even bringing it down at null is today made more than possible.

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Reusable Chinese Space Craft Lands Returns Earth

The Chinese government has announced the safe return of a reusable spacecraft, called Chongfu Shiyong Shiyan Hangtian Qi (CSSHQ), to Earth, after spending two days in orbit. 

The unmanned spacecraft was launched on Friday, September 4th, 2020, from the Jiuquan Satelite Launch Center in northwest China’s section of the Gobi Desert, before safely returning to its scheduled landing site. The spacecraft’s purpose was reportedly to test reusable technologies that will provide ‘technological support for the peaceful use of space’, although no information about what technologies were tested has been made public. 

Adding to this, no pictures nor information of the spacecraft itself have been released into the press either, although the Chinese government did say that it was launched via a Long March-2F carrier rocket. This makes CSSHQ the 14th mission for the rocket, also used by the Chinese to send astronauts into orbit, as well as its own space

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