Mystery Deepens Around Unmanned Spy Boat Washed Up In Scotland

Last week a small unmanned vessel washed up on the rocky Scottish Isle of Tiree, about a hundred miles from the UK’s nuclear submarine base as Faslane.  It was identified as a Wave Glider, a type made by U.S. company Liquid Robotics, capable of traveling thousands of miles and used by both the U.S. Navy and Britain’s Royal Navy as well as other government agencies and scientific researchers. The local Coastguard have been unable to trace the owner so far, but the craft’s configuration suggests it was on a secret mission.

Contacted by Forbes, Britain’s Ministry of Defence were at first uncertain, but later provided a definite statement.

“The vessel is not ours,” said a spokesman.

They could not provide any information

Read More
Read More

Does Amazon spy on politicians?



Jeff Bezos wearing a suit and tie: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Andrej Sokolow/picture alliance via Getty Images


© Andrej Sokolow/picture alliance via Getty Images
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Andrej Sokolow/picture alliance via Getty Images

  • European lawmakers want to know if Amazon has spied on them.
  • 37 members of European Parliament wrote to CEO Jeff Bezos about the retail giant’s moves to sniff out union activity.
  • The letter follows now-deleted Amazon job postings for staffers who would monitor threats such as “labor organizing” and “hostile political leaders.”
  • “Has Amazon already spied on Members of the European Parliament?” the lawmakers asked.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

European lawmakers have written to Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos demanding to know: Does Amazon spy on politicians?

Loading...

Load Error

In the letter dated Wednesday, 37 members of the European Parliament (MEPs) wrote expressed concerns about Amazon’s efforts to sniff out union activity within its ranks.

“We are concerned about whether European trade unions, as well as local, national, or European

Read More
Read More

Watch ULA Launch a Spy Satellite on a Delta IV Heavy Rocket Tonight

A Delta Heavy IV rocket launches NASA’s Parker Solar Probe from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral in August 2018.

A Delta Heavy IV rocket launches NASA’s Parker Solar Probe from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral in August 2018.
Photo: Bill Ingalls/NASA (Getty Images)

A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket carrying a classified payload for the National Reconnaissance Office will take off from Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex-37 in Florida shortly before midnight on Wednesday. Assuming, that is, there isn’t another one of the last-minute delays that have hounded the mission for months.

The rocket and its semi-mysterious payload, dubbed NROL-44, were originally slated to take off in June. But NROL-44 was delayed until Aug. 29 with no explanation ever offered to the public, according to Ars Technica. It then malfunctioned on that date, with a faulty part causing a hotfire abort after its three RS-68 engines had already begun firing. Repairs took weeks.

NROL-44 was then scheduled to take off on Sept.

Read More
Read More

After lengthy delays, ULA’s most powerful rocket poised to launch classified spy satellite

After many weeks of delays due to faulty equipment and bad weather, the United Launch Alliance is set to launch its most powerful rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida, lofting a classified spy satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office. The mission is finally ready to fly a full month after the rocket’s first launch attempt, which was aborted just three seconds before liftoff.

The rocket going up on ULA’s mission is the Delta IV Heavy, a giant vehicle that consists of three rocket cores strapped together to provide extra thrust. It’s one of the most powerful rockets in the world, though it falls short of the power packed into SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy. ULA doesn’t fly the Delta IV Heavy very often, as it’s an expensive vehicle to make, but the company uses the rocket for large, heavy satellites headed to super-high orbits.

The rocket’s payload is NROL-44, and like all NRO

Read More
Read More

Watch ULA’s most powerful rocket launch a classified spy satellite



a close up of a tall building lit up at night


Just before midnight on Tuesday, the United Launch Alliance is set to launch its most powerful rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida, lofting a classified spy satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office. The mission is finally ready to fly a full month after the rocket’s first launch attempt, which was aborted just three seconds before liftoff.

Loading...

Load Error

The rocket going up on ULA’s mission is the Delta IV Heavy, a giant vehicle that consists of three rocket cores strapped together to provide extra thrust. It’s one of the most powerful rockets in the world, though it falls short of the power packed into SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy. ULA doesn’t fly the Delta IV Heavy very often, as it’s an expensive vehicle to make, but the company uses the rocket for large, heavy satellites headed to super-high orbits.

The rocket’s payload is NROL-44, and like all NRO missions, its purpose is cloaked

Read More
Read More

United Launch Alliance postpones spy satellite launch again

ORLANDO, Fla., Sept. 28 (UPI) — United Launch Alliance postponed launch of a spy satellite for the U.S. Department of Defense on Monday due to lightning and stormy weather in the area near Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The company’s powerful Delta IV Heavy rocket had been scheduled to carry the satellite aloft at 12:02 a.m. EDT Tuesday.

ULA set a new new launch time for 11:58 p.m. EDT Tuesday. A significant risk exists, however, that storms could postpone liftoff again, according to U.S. Space Force meteorologists.

The launch has been delayed by various woes besides Mother Nature.

On Aug. 29, controllers halted a launch three seconds before liftoff. The company blamed a faulty helium pressure regulator for that abort. The mission was further delayed due to a problem with a retractable support arm at the launch site, according to ULA.

The mission is to utilize a Delta

Read More
Read More

Launch of spy satellite from Florida postponed again

Astronauts make round trip to space station from U.S. soil

NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley (C) waves to onlookers as he boards a plane at Naval Air Station Pensacola to return him and NASA astronaut Robert Behnken home to Houston a few hours after the duo landed in their SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft off the coast of Pensacola, Fla,, on August 2, 2020. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | License Photo

Read More
Read More

You can watch a US spy satellite launch on a giant Delta IV Heavy rocket tonight. Here’s how.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A new U.S. spy satellite will launch into space early Saturday (Sept. 27) on the mightiest rocket built by the United Launch Alliance (ULA): the massive Delta IV Heavy.

The booster is set to blast off overnight at 12:10 a.m. EDT (0410  GMT) from Pad 37 here at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to carry the classified NROL-44 satellite into orbit for the  the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). You  can watch all the fiery action live online, courtesy of ULA. Launch coverage will begin about 20 minutes prior to liftoff, and you can watch the launch live here and on the Space.com homepage or directly via the ULA webcast. 

The mission has been delayed nearly a month after a rare, last-second abort on the launch pad on Aug. 29. According to ULA, the launch window lasts about 94 minutes.

Declassified: Vintage US spy satellites and

Read More
Read More