Staying connected when the world falls apart: How carriers keep networks going

To Mike Muniz, an area manager for AT&T’s network disaster recovery team, witnessing the aftermath of Hurricane Michael was like entering a war zone.

On Oct. 10, 2018, two days after forming over the Caribbean Sea, Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle. The most powerful hurricane to hit the US since Andrew in 1992, the Category 5 Michael killed 45 people, left 700,000 residents across Florida, Georgia and Alabama without power and caused $25 billion in damage.

Muniz arrived in Mexico Beach, Florida, a couple days later to help restore the area’s cell service, which the storm had wiped out.

“I look back, I think it was worse than Puerto Rico [after Hurricane Maria in 2017],” Muniz says. “I remember seeing people just wandering around.”

Following disasters that topple cellphone towers or knock entire networks offline, wireless providers need to be on top of their game when repairing

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You May Soon Be Staying In This Futuristic Hotel

Spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic, a group of 325 hotel industry executives coordinated by The Gettys Group, a Chicago-based design, development and consulting firm, have been meeting since June to brainstorm hotel innovations. The global think tank called The Hotel of Tomorrow Project which includes operators, designers, manufacturers and owners from Four Seasons, Hilton, IHG and Marriott among others recently released its findings culled from 79 suggested ideas from 16 teams globally that were then shopped to 1000 industry executives for their input. These five ideas were deemed to have the most potential.

Proving that how guests sleep was the most significant feature, the most popular was the Bed XYZ, an optimized sleep platform devised to enhance the guest room environment. Specially engineered fabrics control bed temperature and

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