Boxed Out of the West, Huawei Looks to Russia to Survive the Crisis and Emerge Stronger

Lauren Dudley is a research associate for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

This is the first part of a two-part series on Huawei’s expansion in Russia as a reaction to geopolitical technology tensions. The first part discusses how Russia fits into Huawei’s immediate efforts to adapt to its inability to access U.S. technologies, and the second part explores Russia’s role in Huawei’s long-term strategy.

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Technology and Innovation

Few, if any, other companies have been as affected by China’s ongoing geopolitical technology tensions as Huawei. The Chinese tech behemoth, with business interests including telecommunications, cloud computing, and artificial intelligence (AI), has taken a hit as its access to foreign technology has been restricted by the Trump administration and suspicion of its products, particularly 5G network equipment, grows.

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Bion Announces New U.S. Patent Provides Stronger Coverage of Third-Gen Technology

NEW YORK, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC QB: BNET), a developer of comprehensive livestock waste treatment technology that generates multiple new revenue streams while largely mitigating the environmental impacts of large-scale livestock production, announced that it has received a new U.S. patent that strengthens the coverage of its third generation (3G) technology platform.

Patent No. 10,793,458 was issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on October 6, 2020. The patent describes the formation of ammonium bicarbonate in Bion’s 3G system from the ammonia, carbon dioxide and water vapor contained in the waste stream, and the further crystallization of that ammonium bicarbonate. Essentially, the patent covers the production of concentrated ammonia (nitrogen) fertilizer products in crystal (solid) form, from a livestock waste stream. The patent significantly strengthens Bion’s IP position, not only by covering current methods, but also by laying a foundation for future development.

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Cheaper refrigerators? Stronger hip implants? A better understanding of human disease? All of these could be possible — ScienceDaily

Cheaper refrigerators? Stronger hip implants? A better understanding of human disease? All of these could be possible and more, someday, thanks to an ambitious new project underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

NIST researchers are in the early stages of a massive undertaking to design and build a fleet of tiny ultra-sensitive thermometers. If they succeed, their system will be the first to make real-time measurements of temperature on the microscopic scale in an opaque 3D volume — which could include medical implants, refrigerators, and even the human body.

The project is called Thermal Magnetic Imaging and Control (Thermal MagIC), and the researchers say it could revolutionize temperature measurements in many fields: biology, medicine, chemical synthesis, refrigeration, the automotive industry, plastic production — “pretty much anywhere temperature plays a critical role,” said NIST physicist Cindi Dennis. “And that’s everywhere.”

The NIST team has now finished building

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Survey shows broad bipartisan support for a stronger focus on science

ARLINGTON, VA — A recent survey commissioned by Research!America on behalf of a working group formed to assess America’s commitment to science shows overwhelming support for science across political parties. A strong majority of Americans agree that “the COVID-19 pandemic is a disruptive event and requires urgent refocusing of America’s commitment to science.” On a bipartisan basis, Americans:

  • Believe science benefits them (88%);
  • Would pay $1 more a week in taxes to support scientific research (66%);
  • Believe America should maintain its global leadership in science (89%);
  • View basic scientific research that advances the frontiers of knowledge as necessary and should be supported by the federal government (77%);
  • Support incentives for private sector investment in science and technology (76%);
  • Express concern about the number of children without home internet access (64%); and
  • Agree the U.S. is at a critical point for committing to a major new initiative to assure
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