The original digital watch button foretold the battery life struggle of modern smartwatches

In hindsight, it sounds almost ridiculous. An expensive watch with technology that’s never been put on your wrist before that costs hundreds of dollars more than a traditional timepiece. And get this: this fancy, futuristic gadget cant even continuously show the time.



a close up of a computer


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No, I’m not talking about the original Apple Watch. I’m talking about the Pulsar Time Computer, the first commercially sold digital watch, which was released back in the 1970s by Hamilton. But despite the 50-year difference, the Pulsar foretold the same issues that we still struggle with today on our modern smartwatches — and fixed them the way we do, too: with a button.

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50 years later, we still struggle with battery life

The original Pulsar was a revolutionary device, so cool and futuristic that it appeared in Live and Let Die on the wrist of Roger Moore’s

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Asian stocks struggle to build on Wall Street gains, dollar rises

SINGAPORE/NEW YORK (Reuters) – Asia’s stock markets struggled to emulate Wall Street’s rebound on Wednesday as persistent worries about the global economic recovery kept investors cautious, while ebbing inflation expectations helped the U.S. dollar to a two-month high.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan .MIAPJ0000PUS was steady after two days of declines, but the mood was hardly bullish.

Japan’s Nikkei .N225 returned from a two-day holiday to drop 0.6%. Markets in Shanghai .SSEC and Hong Kong .HSI opened flat, the ASX 200 <.AXJO rose 1.6% and South Korea’s Kospi .KS11 fell 0.8% on a jump in coronavirus infections.

“I think that reflects a lingering caution. The pandemic is still a concern…non-tech stocks are still weighed down by COVID-19,” said Bank of Singapore analyst Moh Siong Sim.

Foreign exchange markets best reflected those worries and a strong dollar kept Asia’s currencies on the back

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