MIT Sloan Management Review Announces in One of the Largest Ever Studies of Corporate Culture the 2020 Culture Champions

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and MILL VALLEY, Calif., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, MIT Sloan Management Review announced the 2020 Culture Champions, as determined by the Culture 500, a groundbreaking study that scientifically compares the corporate cultures of more than 500 of the largest companies driving the U.S. economy.  

The Culture Champions list comes out of the Culture 500, a large-scale, interactive research study conducted by researchers at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Studying over 1.4 million Glassdoor reviews from more than 500 of the largest employers in the United States, the Culture 500 is notable for its large scale — it is one of the largest studies of corporate culture ever conducted — and use of groundbreaking AI technology developed at MIT to make sense of over a million employee reviews.

The standout organizations in the study, the 21 Culture Champions were recognized because their employees

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Studies examine the basic biology of schistosomes to uncover vulnerabilities that could lead to new treatments — ScienceDaily

Two studies led by UT Southwestern researchers shed light on the biology and potential vulnerabilities of schistosomes — parasitic flatworms that cause the little-known tropical disease schistosomiasis. The findings, published online today in Science, could change the course of this disease that kills up to 250,000 people a year.

About 240 million people around the world have schistosomiasis — mostly children in Africa, Asia, and South America in populations that represent “the poorest of the poor,” says study leader James J. Collins III, Ph.D., associate professor in UTSW’s department of pharmacology.

Most of those infected survive, but those who die often suffer organ failure or parasite-induced cancer. Symptoms can be serious enough to keep people from living productive lives, Collins says.

The parasite that causes this disease has a complicated life cycle that involves stages in both freshwater snails and mammals. Dwelling in mammalian hosts’ circulatory systems, schistosomes feed

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Preliminary results of two large immune therapy studies show promise in advanced cervical cancer — ScienceDaily

Preliminary results from two independent, phase II clinical trials investigating a new PD-1 (programmed cell death protein 1)-based immune therapy for metastatic cervical cancer suggest potential new treatment options for a disease that currently has limited effective options and disproportionately impacts younger women.

David O’Malley, MD, of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC — James), presented the preliminary study results at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Virtual Congress 2020 on Sept. 18. O’Malley was the lead presenter for both trials, which were sponsored by Agenus Inc.

Each study involved more than 150 patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer from cancer treatment centers across the United States and Europe. All patients were previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy as a first-line therapy. The two independent but consecutive phase II trials tested a new immune-based agent

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Potomac Institute for Policy Studies Promotes Dr. Jennifer Buss to Chief Executive Officer and General Al Gray to Chairman, Board of Directors

ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Board of Directors of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce the promotion of Dr. Jennifer Buss to Chief Executive Officer, and selection of General Al Gray as the new Chairman of the Board. Dr. Buss will immediately assume all duties and responsibilities that accompany the CEO position at the Institute. She was also named a member of the Board of Directors.

“I am incredibly humbled and honored to lead the Institute. I’ve been invested in its mission since I arrived,” Dr. Buss said. “I am committed to progressing the Institute and its contributions to policy in ever-changing science and technology.”

Dr. Buss replaces Mike Swetnam, who passed away in September. “Mike challenged and inspired me every day. It is because of his mentoring, and the leadership of General Al Gray, that I am ready for this new opportunity.”

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Seven studies describe progress thus far and challenges ahead for a revolutionary zero-emissions power source — ScienceDaily

Two and a half years ago, MIT entered into a research agreement with startup company Commonwealth Fusion Systems to develop a next-generation fusion research experiment, called SPARC, as a precursor to a practical, emissions-free power plant.

Now, after many months of intensive research and engineering work, the researchers charged with defining and refining the physics behind the ambitious reactor design have published a series of papers summarizing the progress they have made and outlining the key research questions SPARC will enable.

Overall, says Martin Greenwald, deputy director of MIT’s Plasma Science and Fusion Center and one of the project’s lead scientists, the work is progressing smoothly and on track. This series of papers provides a high level of confidence in the plasma physics and the performance predictions for SPARC, he says. No unexpected impediments or surprises have shown up, and the remaining challenges appear to be manageable. This sets a

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Compact Nuclear Fusion Reactor Is ‘Very Likely to Work,’ Studies Suggest

Scientists developing a compact version of a nuclear fusion reactor have shown in a series of research papers that it should work, renewing hopes that the long-elusive goal of mimicking the way the sun produces energy might be achieved and eventually contribute to the fight against climate change.

Construction of a reactor, called Sparc, which is being developed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a spinoff company, Commonwealth Fusion Systems, is expected to begin next spring and take three or four years, the researchers and company officials said.

Although many significant challenges remain, the company said construction would be followed by testing and, if successful, building of a power plant that could use fusion energy to generate electricity, beginning in the next decade.

This ambitious timetable is far faster than that of the world’s largest fusion-power project, a multinational effort in Southern France called ITER, for International

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Women especially affected, studies show — ScienceDaily

The anxiety, stress and worry brought on by COVID-19 is not limited to daytime hours. The pandemic is affecting our dreams as well, infusing more anxiety and negative emotions into dreams and spurring dreams about the virus itself, particularly among women, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

In a special section in the journal Dreaming, researchers reported on the results of four studies from around the world about people’s dreams during the pandemic. Previous research has suggested that our dreams often reflect what’s happening in our waking lives and that other crises — including war, natural disasters and terrorist attacks — have led to an increase in anxious dreams. The four studies in this special section found that the same is true of COVID-19.

“All of these studies support the continuity hypothesis of dreaming: That dreams are consistent with our waking concerns rather than being some

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