World first study links obesity with reduced brain plasticity — ScienceDaily

A world-first study has found that severely overweight people are less likely to be able to re-wire their brains and find new neural pathways, a discovery that has significant implications for people recovering from a stroke or brain injury.

In a new paper published in Brain Sciences, researchers from UniSA and Deakin University show that brain plasticity is impaired in obese people, making it less likely that they can learn new tasks or remember things.

Using a series of experiments involving transcranial magnetic stimulation, the researchers tested 15 obese people aged between 18 and 60, comparing them with 15 people in a healthy-weight control group.

Repeated pulses of electrical stimulation were applied to the brain to see how strongly it responded. The healthy-weight control group recorded significant neural activity in response to the stimulation, suggesting a normal brain plasticity response. In contrast, the response in the obese group was

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Global Car Vacuum Cleaners Market Covid-19 Pandemic Study and Latest Technology, Expansion Strategies Till 2029

Pune, Maharashtra, India, August 31 2020 (Wiredrelease) Prudour Pvt. Ltd –: Market.us published a new industry research report on “Positive And Negative Impact Of Coronavirus/Covid-19 on Global Car Vacuum Cleaners Market with detailed information break-down data by product types, segmentation by application, 2020 leading key players scenario visible among the impact of COVID-19 such as UNIT, Dirt Devil, Carzkool and Amor, Media, Metropolitan, Eureka, Hoover, Haier, Goodyear, Black and Decker, Vapamore and Bissell. 

The Car Vacuum Cleaners market has been pickup high-quality momentum in the latest years includes a thorough compilation of the quantitative analysis of the industry for a period of 10 years in order to assist players to grow in the market. A more extensive study of the product application and services conducted by subject matter experts assessing the Car Vacuum Cleaners market displays data in a statistical format to offer a better understanding of the dynamics that

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ECMO outcomes study at experienced centers suggests key role for treating worst-hit patients as pandemic continues — ScienceDaily

It saved lives in past epidemics of lung-damaging viruses. Now, the life-support option known as ECMO appears to be doing the same for many of the critically ill COVID-19 patients who receive it, according to a new international study.

The 1,035 patients in the study faced a staggeringly high risk of death, as ventilators and other care failed to support their lungs. But after they were placed on ECMO, their actual death rate was less than 40%. That’s similar to the rate for patients treated with ECMO in past outbreaks of lung-damaging viruses, and other severe forms of viral pneumonia.

The new study published in The Lancet provides strong support for the use of ECMO — short for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation — in appropriate patients as the pandemic rages on worldwide.

It may help more hospitals that have ECMO capability understand which of their COVID-19 patients might benefit from the

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Study shows Massachusetts response to COVID-19 in nursing homes helped stem infection rate — ScienceDaily

A paper just published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that adherence to infection control processes, especially proper wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and cohorting strategies, such as grouping residents based on their risk of infection or whether they tested positive for COVID-19, was significantly associated with declines in weekly infection and mortality rates.

Lewis A. Lipsitz, M.D., Director of the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research and Chief Academic Officer at Hebrew SeniorLife, was the lead author on the report, which analyzed the process and outcome of Massachusetts’ novel state-wide COVID-19 infection control program developed to stem the rate of infection among vulnerable nursing home populations.

In April 2020, Massachusetts nursing homes became a hotspot for COVID-19 infections and associated deaths. In response, Governor Charles Baker allocated $130 million in additional nursing home funding for two months. Funding was contingent on compliance with

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3D-printed nasal swabs work as well as commercial swabs for COVID-19 diagnostic testing, study finds — ScienceDaily

As COVID-19 quickly spread worldwide this spring, shortages of supplies, including the nasopharyngeal (nasal) swabs used to collect viral samples, limited diagnostic testing.

Now, a multisite clinical trial led by the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine and its primary hospital affiliate Tampa General Hospital (TGH) provides the first evidence that 3D-printed alternative nasal swabs work as well, and safely, as the standard synthetic flocked nasal swabs.

The results were published online Sept. 10 in Clinical Infectious Diseases. A commentary accompanying the paper cites the authors’ timely, collaborative response to supply chain disruptions affecting testing capacity early in the pandemic.

Seeking a solution to an unprecedented demand for nasal swabs at their own institution and others, USF Health researchers in the Departments of Radiology and Infectious Diseases reached out to colleagues at TGH; Northwell Health, New York’s largest health care provider; and leading 3D-printer

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Researchers used miniature microscopes to conduct first-ever study of astrocyte calcium activity in sleep in freely behaving animals — ScienceDaily

A new study published today in the journal Current Biology suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons, the brain’s nerve cells.

Led by researchers at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, the study builds new momentum toward ultimately solving the mystery of why we sleep and how sleep works in the brain. The discovery may also set the stage for potential future treatment strategies for sleep disorders and neurological diseases and other conditions associated with troubled sleep, such as PTSD, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and autism spectrum disorder.

“What we know about sleep has been based largely on neurons,” said lead author and postdoctoral research associate Ashley Ingiosi. Neurons, she explained, communicate through electrical signals that can be readily captured through electroencephalography (EEG). Astrocytes — a type of glial (or “glue”) cell that interacts with neurons

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Oryzenin Market Development Status, Emerging Technologies, Regional Trends and Comprehensive Research Study 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 25, 2020 (AmericaNewsHour) —
The global Oryzenin market was valued at USD 88.1 million in 2016 and is projected to reach USD 291.0 million by 2025, growing at a CAGR of 14.2% from 2017 to 2025.

Oryzenin is a glutellin found in rice. The growing importance regarding consumption of plant based proteins is driving the demand for oryzenin. The proven health benefits from rice based proteins is expected to play a major role in driving demand for oryzenin over the forecast period.

The Final Report will cover the impact analysis of COVID-19 on this industry:

Download Sample of This Strategic Report: https://www.kennethresearch.com/sample-request-10058985

Sample Infographics:

Market Dynamics:
1. Market Drivers
1.1 Increasing demand for rice proteins
1.2 Growing health consciousness among consumers
2. Market Restraints
2.1 Rice protein acceptance is still at nascent stage
2.2 Competition from

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Medallion Launches Comparative Study of Rare-Earth Element Separation Technologies

Rare-Earth Product Flow

Rare-Earth Product Flow
Rare-Earth Product Flow
Rare-Earth Product Flow

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Sept. 25, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Medallion Resources Ltd. (TSX-V: MDL; OTCPK: MLLOF; Frankfurt: MRDN) – “Medallion” or the “Company”), is pleased to announce the initiation of a comprehensive comparative technical and commercial review of existing and emerging rare-earth element (REE) separation technologies.  

Medallion’s REE extraction process from monazite has achieved the technical milestones needed to consider binding downstream partnerships, while the Company’s improved financial position is enabling stronger commitments within the REE supply chain. Leading technologies, subject to appropriate business conditions, will be considered for partnership or investment by Medallion or its North American focused REE Consortium financial backers Talaxis Limited, (the technology metals unit of Noble Holdings) and Amvest Capital Inc., both significant Medallion shareholders.

“Medallion has identified four leading and approximately ten additional groups with potential technologies for REE separation, alongside the industry incumbent

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These 7 Bug-Themed Science Projects Let Researchers Study What’s in Your Backyard

Citizen Science Salon is a partnership between Discover and SciStarter.org.


You can call them “insects, spiders and their relatives,” or you can call them “bugs” and incur the wrath of those who point out that the only true bugs are hemipteran insects like stinkbugs and cicadas. No matter what you call them, they’re fascinating and critically important. And you can help scientists who study bugs by volunteering with these citizen science projects.


caterpillars count

A spurge hawkmoth seen in Switzerland. (Credit: Daniel Schwen/Wikimedia Commons)

Caterpillars Count!

Help tally these moth and butterfly babies as they gorge on greenery this fall, gaining the strength to spin their cocoons and chrysalides. Your data will help the scientists at Caterpillars Count! understand how the abundance of these bugs varies from rural countrysides to major urban areas, and from coast to coast.


never-home-alone

(Credit: Matt Bertone/Never Home Alone)

Never Home Alone

You may never feel lonely again

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UK scientists begin study of how long Covid can survive in the air

It is the question scientists around the world are trying to answer: how long can the coronavirus survive in the tiny aerosol particles we exhale? In a high-security lab near Bristol, entered through a series of airlock doors, scientists may be weeks from finding out.

On Monday, they will start launching tiny droplets of live Sars-CoV-2 and levitating them between two electric rings to test how long the airborne virus remains infectious under different environmental conditions.

“It is a very important question,” said Prof Denis Doorly, an expert in fluid mechanics at Imperial College London, who is not involved in the research. “There is now huge interest in what it could take to mitigate the risk of infection in enclosed spaces, in terms of enhanced natural ventilation, or air-scrubbing systems, or UV-C lighting – but this all depends on knowing how much viable virus remains suspended in the air.”

Until

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