Talc and petroleum jelly among the best lubricants for people wearing PPE, study finds — ScienceDaily

For frontline healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) like face visors, googles, and respiratory protective equipment is an essential part of working life. More workers are wearing facial PPE now than ever before, often for extended periods of time, to protect them against the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

However, extended PPE use, particularly on the delicate skin of the face, can cause friction and shear injuries like skin tears, blistering, ulcers, and hives.

The effects of friction and shear can be reduced by lubricants, which workers are advised to apply every half hour. Half-hourly applications can be impractical during shift work and may expose workers to the virus, and many typical moisturisers don’t last long as they are designed to be absorbed into the skin for a ‘non-greasy feel’.

Now, researchers from Imperial College London have investigated which products create the longest-lasting protective layer between PPE and

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Variation in genes associated with viral entry of SARS-CoV-2 unlikely to influence COVID-19 morbidity and mortality, study finds — ScienceDaily

A comprehensive search of genetic variation databases has revealed no significant differences across populations and ethnic groups in seven genes associated with viral entry of SARS-CoV-2.

African Americans and Latinos in the United States and ethnic minorities in the United Kingdom are disproportionately affected by COVID-19. They are more likely to develop severe symptoms and also show significantly higher mortality compared with other regional and ethnic groups.

To investigate if this disparity could be caused by genetic variation, a team of three researchers — including Assistant Professor Ji-Won Lee of Hokkaido University’s Graduate School of Dental Medicine — surveyed publicly available databases of genomic variants, including gnomAD, the Korean Reference Genome Database, TogoVar (a Japanese genetic variation database) and the 1000 Genomes Project. They studied variants across multiple regional and ethnic groups in seven genes known to play roles in viral entry into host cells and recognition of viral RNA

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Researchers develop a human skin mimic to study mosquito biting in high resolution without using humans as ‘bait’ — ScienceDaily

Scientists have developed a tool for studying the biting behaviour of common pathogen-carrying mosquitoes, according to new research published this week in eLife.

The tool, which uses an artificial blood meal and a surface that mimics human skin, will provide detailed understanding of blood feeding without using human subjects as bait. It can also fit conveniently into a backpack, allowing the study of mosquitoes in laboratory and natural environments.

Blood feeding is essential for mosquitoes to reproduce, but it is during blood feeds on human hosts that they pass on pathogens such as malaria.

“Although the initial step in obtaining a blood meal — flying towards a host — is relatively well characterised, the steps that unfold after a mosquito has landed on a host are less well understood,” explains first author Felix Hol, a researcher at Institut Pasteur and the Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity, Paris, France. “There

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Global Virtual Reality for Smartphone Market Phenomenal Growth Prospects, Opportunities, SWOT Study and Volume| Samsung, Google, Merge

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 24, 2020 (WiredRelease via Comtex) —
The latest research report provides a complete assessment of the Global Virtual Reality for Smartphone market for the forecast year 2020-2029, which is beneficial for companies regardless of their size and revenue. This Survey report covering the major market insights and industry approach towards COVID-19 in the upcoming years 2020-2029. The Virtual Reality for Smartphone Market Report presents data and information on the development of the investment structure, technological improvements, market trends and developments, capabilities, and comprehensive information on the key players of the Virtual Reality for Smartphone Market. The market strategies undertaken, with respect to the current and future scenario of the industry, have also been listed in the study.

The report begins with a brief presentation and overview of the Virtual Reality for Smartphone market, about the current

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Study investigates the influence of lockdown on geodetic measurements — ScienceDaily

Emerging use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) makes it possible to continuously measure shallow changes in elevation of Earth surface. A study by the University of Bonn now shows that the quality of these measurements may have improved significantly during the pandemic, at least at some stations. The results show which factors should be considered in the future when installing GPS antennas. More precise geodetic data are important for assessing flood risks and for improving earthquake early warning systems. The journal Geophysical Research Letters now reports on this.

A number of countries went into politically decreed late hibernation at the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. Many of those affected by the lockdown suffered negative economic and social consequences. Geodesy, a branch of the Earth Science to study Earth’s gravity field and its shape, on the other hand, has benefited from the drastic reduction in human activity. At least that

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Death counts fail to capture full mortality effects of COVID-19, study finds — ScienceDaily

More than 200,000 people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19. Some argue that statistic is inaccurate due to inconsistencies in how deaths are being reported. But researchers from the University of South Florida claim that even if those deaths have been correctly measured, the number doesn’t fully convey the true mortality effects of COVID-19.

A study published in the Journal of Public Health finds that for each person in the U.S. who died after contracting COVID-19, an average of nearly 10 years of life had been lost. Researchers claim “years of life lost” is a more insightful measure than death count since it accounts for the ages of the deceased. The tool is often used to determine the effects of non-communicable disease, drug misuse and suicide. They believe “years of life lost” is especially appropriate given the range of ages at which individuals have died of COVID-19.

“While death

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This app can help cigarette smokers quit, study finds

There’s an app for everything.

Now there’s even a smartphone app that has proven to be effective in helping cigarette smokers kick the habit, a study by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle found.

iCanQuit, an app that uses acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), proved to be nearly 1.5 times more effective than the National Cancer Institute’s app QuitGuide “in helping smokers quit after 12 months,” according to Fred Hutchinson.

“Our study offers a new approach to quitting smoking,” said Dr. Jonathan Bricker, the study’s lead researcher and professor at Fred Hutch’s Public Health Sciences Division. “By deploying ACT-based methods that focus on acceptance of smoking triggers instead of avoidance of smoking triggers, we believe iCanQuit can help more smokers kick the habit and thereby reduce premature deaths.”

Researchers conducted a large clinical trial with 2,400 adult smokers from across the country. They discovered “for every

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Cancer Biomarkers Market Development Status, Emerging Technologies, Regional Trends and Comprehensive Research Study 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 23, 2020 (AmericaNewsHour) —
Market Overview:

The global Cancer Biomarkers Market was valued at USD 10.19 billion in 2016 and is projected to reach USD 28.03billion by 2025, growing at a CAGR of 11.9% from 2017 to 2025.

Cancer Biomarkers have high usage in Cancer diagnostics and treatment, especially in Tissue specific therapies. Therefore market of this genetically engineered product is seeing high values in terms of market value.

The Final Report will cover the impact analysis of COVID-19 on this industry:

Download Sample of This Strategic Report: https://www.kennethresearch.com/sample-request-10008242

Sample Infographics:

Market Dynamics:
1. Market Drivers
1.1 Increasing Technological Developments
1.2 Growingnumber of cancer Patients and usage of biomarkers
1.3 Increasing research in biomarkers
2. Market Restraints
2.1 Reimbursements Risks
2.2 High investment and uncertainty of favorable profits
2.3 Technicality concerns

Market Segmentation:
1. Global Cancer

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The study included 10 sessions of transcranial magnetic stimulation, a type of non-invasive brain stimulation — ScienceDaily

A number of studies have shown how playing video games can lead to structural changes in the brain, including increasing the size of some regions, or to functional changes, such as activating the areas responsible for attention or visual-spatial skills. New research from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) has gone further to show how cognitive changes can take place even years after people stop playing.

This is one of the conclusions from the article published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. The study involved 27 people between the ages of 18 and 40 with and without any kind of experience with video gaming.

“People who were avid gamers before adolescence, despite no longer playing, performed better with the working memory tasks, which require mentally holding and manipulating information to get a result,” said Marc Palaus, who has a PhD from the UOC.

The article stems from Palaus’ doctoral thesis,

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Study shows reassuring initial findings for infant health — ScienceDaily

Infants born to women with COVID-19 showed few adverse outcomes, according to the first report in the country of infant outcomes through eight weeks of age.

The study, led by researchers at UC San Francisco, suggests that babies born to mothers infected with the virus generally do well six to eight weeks after birth, however there was a higher rate of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions reported if the mothers had COVID-19 up to two weeks prior to delivery.

Among 263 infants in the study, adverse outcomes — including preterm birth, NICU admission, and respiratory disease — did not differ between those born to mothers testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 and those born to mothers testing negative. No pneumonia or lower respiratory tract infection were reported through eight weeks of age.

The study is published as a prepublication accepted manuscript in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

“The babies are doing well,

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