Toothless, parrot-like dinosaur thrived 69 million years ago, study finds

Multiple skeletons of the Oksoko avarsan, a feathered omnivorous dinosaur that grew to 2 meters in length, were dug up in the Gobi Desert in Mongolia by researchers from the University of Edinburgh, according to a news statement published Tuesday.

It had a large, toothless beak like modern-day parrots and just two digits on each forearm — one less than its close relatives.

It’s the first time scientists have seen evidence of digit loss among oviraptors, a family of three-fingered dinosaurs.

Evolving to have fewer digits suggests they could also “alter their diets and lifestyles, and enabled them to diversify and multiply,” according to the statement.

The “very complete” juvenile skeletons were found resting together, showing that young Oksoko avarsan roamed in groups, said paleontologist Gregory Funston, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Edinburgh who led the study.

“But more importantly, its two-fingered hand prompted us to look at

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Study suggests EMFs alter redox signaling to improve insulin sensitivity — ScienceDaily

Researchers from the University of Iowa may have discovered a safe new way to manage blood sugar non-invasively. Exposing diabetic mice to a combination of static electric and magnetic fields for a few hours per day normalizes two major hallmarks of type 2 diabetes, according to new findings published Oct. 6 in Cell Metabolism.

“We’ve built a remote control to manage diabetes,” says Calvin Carter, PhD, one of the study’s lead authors and a postdoc in the lab of senior author Val Sheffield, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics, and of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the UI Carver College of Medicine. “Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) for relatively short periods reduces blood sugar and normalizes the body’s response to insulin. The effects are long-lasting, opening the possibility of an EMF therapy that can be applied during sleep to manage diabetes all day.”

The unexpected and surprising discovery may have

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RIT, URMC Receive NIH Funding to Study AI-Enabled Toilet Seat Technology for Heart Failure

Toilet seats with high tech sensors might be the non-invasive technology of the future that could help reduce hospital return rates of individuals with heart disease.

Heart failure is one of the leading causes of adults admitted to hospitals and more than six million adults in the United States have heart disease, according to the American Heart Association. Re-hospitalizations occur in some instances within 30 days to 6-months of initial treatment. Having a way to intercept these rehospitalizations might afford patients improved care and decrease costs.

A joint project by researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), will determine if in-home monitoring can successfully monitor vital signs and reduce risk and costly re-hospitalization rates for people with heart failure. The five-year, $2.9 million venture, is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Close up of FIT Seat technology embedded in a common toilet seat

Photo by: A. Sue Weisler, RIT University Communications

A close

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New study reveals sheep and beef farms close to being carbon neutral



a group of sheep standing on top of a lush green field: The study found on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.


© Getty
The study found on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.

A new study shows New Zealand sheep and beef farms are already offsetting the bulk of their agricultural emissions.

The research – led by Dr Bradley Case at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) – estimates the woody vegetation on sheep and beef farms across the country is offsetting between 63 percent and 118 percent of on-farm agricultural emissions.

If the mid-point of that range is taken, on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.

Dr Case, who is a senior lecturer in GIS and remote sensing at AUT’s Applied Ecology Department in the School of Science, said the findings showed there was a strong case for farmers to get credit for the sequestration already happening on their farms.

“This is an integral part of He Waka

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Typeface that looks like handwriting works best with warm message, study finds — ScienceDaily

Appeals seeking donations to help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic were more successful when the typeface in which the appeal was written mirrored the tone of the donation request, a new study has found.

In a study that asked prospective donors to consider whether and how much to give to a local food bank to help fight hunger during the coronavirus pandemic, researchers found that donors were more likely to give when heartfelt messages were written in typefaces that looked like handwriting, and when messages that talked about the power of an organization were written in typeface that looked more business-like.

In other words, make the font match the message to get more donations, the researchers said.

“Our research suggests that simply changing the typeface of appeals messages could make those appeals stronger and encourage people to make donations,” said Huiling Huang, a consumer sciences doctoral student at The

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Study shows antibiotics may be viable treatment option for appendicitis — ScienceDaily

Every year more than 250,000 people undergo surgery for appendicitis, making it one of the 20 most common surgeries performed in the United States.

In the largest randomized U.S. study of appendicitis published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Henry Ford Health System and 24 other sites around the U.S. report that seven in 10 patients who received antibiotics avoided surgery and that patients who took antibiotics for symptom relief fared no worse in the short term than those who underwent surgery.

Still, researchers cautioned that taking antibiotics for appendicitis is not for everyone and advised patients to consult with their physician.

“The significance of this study means that surgeons and patients now have more options for the treatment of appendicitis,” says J.H. “Pat” Patton, M.D., medical director of Surgical Services for Henry Ford Health System and a study co-investigator. “We now know that we

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First empirical study on how users pay visual attention to mobile app designs shows larger and brighter elements don’t catch our eyes after all — ScienceDaily

As part of an international collaboration, Aalto University researchers have shown that our common understanding of what attracts visual attention to screens, in fact, does not transfer to mobile applications. Despite the widespread use of mobile phones and tablets in our everyday lives, this is the first study to empirically test how users’ eyes follow commonly used mobile app elements.

Previous work on what attracts visual attention, or visual saliency, has centered on desktop and web-interfaces.

‘Apps appear differently on a phone than on a desktop computer or browser: they’re on a smaller screen which simply fits fewer elements and, instead of a horizontal view, mobile devices typically use a vertical layout. Until now it was unclear how these factors would affect how apps actually attract our eyes,’ explains Aalto University Professor Antti Oulasvirta.

In the study, the research team used a large set of representative mobile interfaces and eye

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The coronavirus pandemic has increased global trust in science, study suggests

Over the last three years, 3M’s “State of Science” report found that global skepticism of science was increasing — from 29 percent in 2018 to 32 percent in 2019 to 37 percent in 2020. But a more recent survey taken after the coronavirus pandemic began suggests that trend may be reversing.

In the post-pandemic survey, science skepticism dropped back to 28 percent, while trust in science increased to 89 percent, the highest since the study began. And, more specifically, the number of people who only believe in science that aligns with their personal beliefs is down six points since 2019.

The change is seemingly linked to COVID-19, which has increased the presence of science in people’s lives. Since the 2018 survey, the number of people who agreed that science is very important to their everyday life increased 12 points to 54 percent in the most recent survey, and the same

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What’s this EXIF technology people used to study Trump photos?

An Oct. 3 photo shows President Donald Trump at Walter Reed hospital.

An Oct. 3 photo shows President Donald Trump at Walter Reed hospital.


White House
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

President Donald Trump’s case of COVID-19 gave an obscure photo data technology called EXIF its 15 minutes of internet fame as people started scrutinizing photos taken of him this weekend at Walter Reed hospital. But what exactly is EXIF?

In short, it’s a standard way cameras can embed metadata within a photo file. That data can include the camera model that took the shot, what exposure settings were used, where a photo was taken and, most pertinent in Trump’s case, the time the photo was taken.

That last point is of particular interest, since EXIF data from two Trump

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Vir Biotechnology and GSK announce global expansion to Phase 3 of COMET-ICE study evaluating …

  • Independent Data Monitoring Committee recommended on September 30, 2020 that the study continue into Phase 3 based on a positive evaluation of safety and tolerability data from the Phase 2 lead-in
  • Initial Phase 3 results may be available as early as the end of 2020; results for the primary endpoint are expected in the first quarter of 2021, with current estimates at January 2021
  • If successful, VIR-7831 has the potential to advance outpatient treatment for COVID-19
  • Patient enrollment underway; website live at https://vircovid19study.com/

SAN FRANCISCO and LONDON, Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Vir Biotechnology, Inc. (Nasdaq: VIR) and GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE/NYSE: GSK) today announced the global expansion to Phase 3 of the COMET-ICE (COVID-19 Monoclonal antibody Efficacy Trial – Intent to Care Early) study evaluating VIR-7831 for the early treatment of COVID-19 in patients who are at high risk of hospitalization. VIR-7831 (also known as GSK4182136) is a fully

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