Hubble Space Telescope watches stunning supernova fade over a full year

Tens of millions of years ago, the corpse of a star stole away too much gas from a neighbor and exploded, becoming a beacon in the cosmos — one that took a full year to fade away.

Fortunately for scientists, the massive stellar explosion, called supernova 2018gv, took place 70 million light-years away, and the Hubble Space Telescope was in prime position to watch the lightshow. Astronomers used the instrument to create a timelapse showing the supernova’s year-long fade, from February 2018, shortly after the explosion was first detected, through February 2019.

“No Earthly fireworks display can compete with this supernova, captured in its fading glory by the Hubble Space Telescope,” Adam Riess, an astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute and Johns Hopkins University in Maryland and leader of the team behind the new footage, said in a statement.

Related: The best Hubble Space Telescope images of

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Stunning New Surface Pro X Will Make You Forget Apple’s MacBook

Microsoft has updated its Surface line-up with two challengers taking on key parts of the market. The Surface Laptop Go takes on the mid-range Windows 10 laptop space, while the updated Surface Pro X pushes Microsoft’s plans for Windows 10 on ARM

With Apple set to launch its own ARM-powered MacBook, who has the advantage in this new frontier?

Let’s start with the Pro X. Last year’s Surface Pro X, the first ARM-powered Surface machine, was aiming at a particular group of customers. 2020’s Pro X update hasn’t changed this approach.

The Pro X family is for those looking for a highly mobile device, with 4G LTE connectivity, long battery life, and a focus on productivity. It remains a superb client for cloud based services be they from Microsoft or other providers. If your work revolved around Microsoft Office, Teams, Slack, and web-based tools,

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Watch Firefly Aerospace test-fire its Alpha rocket in this stunning drone video

An epic set of new videos shows the fiery power of Firefly Aerospace’s forthcoming Alpha rocket.

The company showed off first-stage testing, which will certify Alpha for a test flight this fall, in new YouTube videos which include drone footage, fixed ground footage and a mix of cameras that also show off the engines swiveling to test maneuvers during flight.

“Today we performed a test of the Alpha flight first stage,” the startup company said on Twitter Sept. 20. “The four Reaver engines performed 35 seconds of thrust vector control maneuvers, challenging the flame deflectors to constrain all that Reaver power. Today’s test was a major step in Firefly’s march to first flight.”

Related: Firefly Aerospace uses rocket engine to light birthday candles in epic cake video

Firefly Aerospace’s Alpha rocket struts its stuff in videos of new testing.  (Image credit: Firefly Aerospace)

The two-stage Alpha rocket was supposed

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Stunning images from Hubble, Chandra, and more reveal value of space telescope teamwork

What do you get when you put a space telescope to work with another space telescope or two? Amazing compilation images of our universe.

NASA recently highlighted some collaborations between its Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, particularly the Hubble Space Telescope, showing what sorts of images can be produced when you look at the same object in different wavelengths of light.

Gallery: Amazing nebula photos from Chandra & Hubble

M82

(Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC; Optical: NASA/STScI)

The galaxy M82 can be seen edge-on from Earth, allowing scientists a great perspective whenever star formation occurs, since there is little to block our view. Chandra observations, visible in blue and pink, show bursts of high temperatures created when gas is heated by supernova explosions. The Hubble Space Telescope’s optical images (shown in red and orange) reveal the galaxy’s shape.

Abell 2744

(Image credit: NASA/CXC; Optical: NASA/STScI)

The galaxy cluster

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Down a stunning 23%, London’s once mighty FTSE is trading like an emerging-market stock exchange

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Country A is home to one of the oldest stock exchanges in the world where the rule of law is rock solid, and investors are afforded rigorous protections.

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Country B is essentially a petrol state that ranks low on various financial freedom indexes. Its relatively recent transition to a market-based economy has been bumpy, and its embrace of democratic processes and norms has been widely criticized by human rights groups. Country B’s President, for example, recently changed the constitution to extend his rule by decades and is widely suspected of routinely poisoning his political foes.

And yet to investors, the two countries are widely indistinguishable. They’re both seen as a lousy place to sink your spare cash.

You’ve probably guessed Country B

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Yup, Galaxy Note 20 Ultra’s camera took all of these stunning landscape photos

note-20-mull-promo

Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The Galaxy Note 20 Ultra has a lot to shout about: a massive screen, its handy S Pen stylus, 5G connectivity and an attractive design. That all makes it a great phone for high-flying business types, but how does it fare on a rugged photography adventure on a remote island? To find out, I took it to the stunning Isle of Mull off the west coast of Scotland, and found that the Note is more than just a business tool. 

Here’s what I liked. 

Awesome 5x zoom

It’s a given that the Note 20 should be able to take cracking photos in its standard zoom mode. And it does — they’re bright and vibrant and packed with detail. But it’s the zoom skills that I really loved on my trip. The 5x optical zoom let me get wildly different compositions in my images that are simply out of

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Stellar winds hint at how planetary nebulae get their stunning shapes

In their dying throes, some stars leave behind beautiful planetary nebulae — disk, spiral or even butterfly-shaped clouds of dust and gas (SN: 5/17/18).

How these fantastically shaped clouds arise from round stars is a mystery. New observations of red giant stars suggest that massive planets or other objects orbiting dying stars help stir up stellar winds and shape planetary nebulae, researchers report in the Sept. 18 Science.

“We were wondering how stars can get these beautiful shapes,” says Leen Decin, an astrophysicist at KU Leuven in Belgium. So she and her colleagues examined 14 stars in the red giant phase, before they become planetary nebulae. Data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in Chile revealed that stellar winds — fast-moving flows of gas, dust and subatomic particles such as protons — ejected from the red giant stars have different shapes, including spirals, disks and cones.

Mathematical

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