The Note: Biden sees masks as symbol and substance in drawing contrast with Trump

The TAKE with Rick Klein

Trump wore a mask Monday in leaving Walter Reed for the White House — but it didn’t stay on long. By the end of another extraordinary night, with an infected president urging people not to let COVID-19 “dominate” their lives, it may as well have never been on.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is calling that out, as he pleads for science over showmanship with a month to go before Election Day.

“Anybody who contracts the virus by essentially saying masks don’t matter, social distancing doesn’t matter, I think is responsible for what happens to them,” Biden said in Monday night’s NBC town hall. “What is this macho thing — ‘I’m not going to wear a mask?’ What’s the deal here? Big deal!”

PHOTO: Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a campaign stop at Jose Marti Gym in Miami, Oct. 5, 2020.

Democratic

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Substance with new mechanism of action found — ScienceDaily

The villain in this drama has a pretty name: Aurora — Latin for dawn. In the world of biochemistry, however, Aurora (more precisely: Aurora-A kinase) stands for a protein that causes extensive damage. There, it has been known for a long time that Aurora often causes cancer. It triggers the development of leukemias and many pediatric cancers, such as neuroblastomas.

Researchers at the universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt have now developed a drug that can disarm Aurora. Dr. Elmar Wolf, biochemist and research group leader at the Biocenter of Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU), and Stefan Knapp, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at Goethe University Frankfurt, have played a leading role in this development. The results of their work have now been published in the latest issue of Nature Chemical Biology.

Making tumor-promoting proteins disappear

“Cancers are usually triggered by tumorigenic proteins,” explains Elmar Wolf. Because cancer cells produce more of these

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Worry, fear of COVID-19 amplifies risk of substance abuse — ScienceDaily

Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research. Michael Zvolensky, University of Houston Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished University Professor of Psychology and director of the Anxiety and Health Research Laboratory/Substance Use Treatment Clinic, has published two papers discussing the psychological, addictive and health behavior issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic from a behavioral science perspective.

“The impact of COVID-19 on psychological symptoms and disorders, addiction and health behavior is substantial and ongoing and will negatively impact people’s mental health and put them at greater risk for chronic illness and drug addiction,” reports Zvolensky in Behaviour Research and Therapy. “It will not equally impact all of society. Those at greater risk are those that have mental health vulnerabilities or disorders.”

For instance,

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