SEC sues John McAfee over promoting cryptocurrency offerings on Twitter

John McAfee

Paula Bustamante | AFP | Getty Images

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday sued John McAfee, creator of the eponymous anti-virus software, alleging that he made over $23.1 million in undisclosed compensation from recommending seven cryptocurrency offerings on Twitter that were materially false and misleading.

The regulator, which is seeking a trial by jury, alleged that from at least November 2017 through February 2018, McAfee recommended cryptocurrencies that he was paid to promote, while falsely denying “he was being paid by the issuers.”

“McAfee leveraged his fame to make more than $23.1 million in undisclosed compensation” by recommending at least seven initial coin offerings or ICOs to his Twitter followers, the SEC said.

McAfee’s recommendations were “materially false and misleading,” in that he tried to sell “virtually worthless” cryptocurrency tokens by encouraging investors to buy the securities without disclosing his own holdings, the SEC alleged.

The

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After Math: Sonos sues Google again while Facebook keeps cleaning house

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Engadget

While scoping out a suspected subterranean lake hiding under the Martian soil, scientists stumbled across not one, not two, but three more of them encircling the original. And they’re not puddles by any means. The research team estimates the largest one to measure up to 19 miles across with the others topping out at a few kilometers apiece. But don’t expect to go swimming on the Red Planet in the near future — we’l have to bore through a kilometer of ice to get to it.

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Engadget

The COVID lockdowns have hit the American auto industry hard this year with demand dropping as people stayed home and off the road. However, that apparently is not the case with Tesla which announced last week it had crushed its previous quarterly delivery record by nearly 27,000 vehicles. Over all, the company has shipped some 318,000 automobiles so far in 2020.

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Engadget

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Apple sues recycling firm for stealing and reselling 100,000 iPhones, iPads and Watches

Apple is suing former recycling partner GEEP Canada — now a part of Quantum Lifecycle Partners — for allegedly stealing and reselling at least 103,845 iPhones, iPads and Watches that it was hired to disassemble. “At least 11,766 pounds of Apple devices left GEEP’s premises without being destroyed – a fact that GEEP itself confirmed,” reads a portion of Apple’s complaint, as reported by The Logic (via AppleInsider).

Apple sent the recycling firm over 500,000 iPhones, iPads, and Apple Watches between January 2015 and December 2017, according to The Logic’s report. When Apple did an audit, it discovered 18 percent of those devices were still accessing the internet through cellular networks. That 18 percent doesn’t count Apple devices without a cellular radio, so it’s possible an even higher percentage of the gadgets were resold.

Apple seeks to obtain at least $31 million Canadian dollars (roughly $22.7 million USD)

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Facebook Sues Marketing Firms Over Stealing User Data From It And Other Tech Giants

Facebook Inc (NASDAQ: FB) on Thursday filed a lawsuit against two companies for allegedly harvesting data from its users in an unauthorized fashion in the Superior Court of California, County of San Mateo.

What Happened: The Mark Zuckerberg-led company said in a statement the two companies scraped data from Facebook and Instagram.

The scraping operation also affected platforms run by Twitter Inc (NYSE: TWTR), Microsoft Corporation’s (NASDAQ: MSFT) LinkedIn, Amazon.com, Inc (NASDAQ: AMZN), and Alphabet Inc’s (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG) YouTube, as per Facebook.

The Menlo Park-based social network giant said that the two companies — Israel-based BrandTotal Ltd and Delaware-incorporated Unimania Inc — allegedly took to scraping the web portals in order to sell marketing intelligence and other services.

Why It Matters: Scraping refers to data collection through unauthorized automation that targets a website or an app.

The social media behemoth said that the two companies purportedly used browser

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Sonos sues Google again for alleged infringement of smart speaker patents

Sonos has levied another lawsuit against Google that claims the Mountain View company infringed on five of its audio technology patents related to smart speakers.

The speaker company filed its first lawsuit against Google in January, accusing the search giant of copying its multi-room audio technology. Google countersued in June, also alleging patent infringement.

In the latest complaint, filed Sept. 29 in the U.S. District court for the Western District of Texas, Sonos claims that Google products such as Chromecast and Nest infringe on core patents covering modern smart device speakers.

Some of the intellectual property that Sonos is bringing into play include patents for remote audio playback controls and multi-zone audio systems. The listed patents include U.S. Patent numbers 9,967,615; 10,779,033; 9,344,206; 10,469,966; and 9,219,460.

Compared to the IP in Sonos’ original lawsuit, the new patents-in-suit are much more recent and less focused on foundational aspects of audio systems.

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Sonos sues Google for infringing five more wireless audio patents

Sonos has filed another patent lawsuit against Google, alleging that the search giant is infringing five wireless audio patents across the entire line of Nest and Chromecast products. The move comes on the eve of Google’s fall hardware event on September 30th, where it is expected to announce a new Chromecast and Nest smart speaker alongside new Pixel phones.

Sonos filed its first patent lawsuits against Google in January in California federal court and with the International Trade Commission; the federal case has been put on hold while the ITC reaches a decision on whether to block Google’s allegedly infringing products from market. The new case is filed only in the federal court for the Western District of Texas — an emerging patent lawsuit hotspot — and represents a more aggressive approach from Sonos.

“We think it’s important to show the depth and breadth of Google’s copying,” says Eddie Lazarus,

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