Brooklyn bishop questions state decision to limit attendance at Sunday services

NEW YORK — Brooklyn Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, standing Saturday outside a 550-seat Catholic church, criticized the state-imposed COVID-19 cap of 10 worshippers for Mass in his diocese.

“We believe this blanket prohibition against using our churches doesn’t make any sense,” he told reporters outside St. Pancras Catholic Church in Queens. “We believe it’s a misunderstanding of the situation.”

DiMarzio spoke hours after a Brooklyn federal judge offered sympathy but no support for the diocese’s lawsuit seeking to reverse the restrictions ordered by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The bishop said the churches would close down rather than hold Sunday services with one priest and a congregation of nine.

U.S. District Judge Eric Komitee, in a Friday night decision, upheld Cuomo’s crackdown on religious services in several “hot spot” Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods with significant upticks in coronavirus cases.

Komitee called it a “difficult decision,” noting a Friday CNN appearance where Cuomo flatly

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Judge rejects bid to delay TikTok U.S. app store ban set for Sunday

FILE PHOTO: Flags of China and U.S. are seen near a Bytedance logo in this illustration picture taken September 18, 2020. REUTERS/Florence Lo/Illustration/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A judge in Pennsylvania on Saturday rejected a request by three TikTok content creators who asked her to temporarily block a government ban on Apple Inc AAPL.O and Alphabet Inc Google GOOGL.O app stores offering the short-video sharing app for download set to take effect on Sunday.

The content creators argued they would “lose access to tens of thousands of potential viewers and creators every month, an effect amplified by the looming threat to close TikTok altogether.”

U.S. District Judge Wendy Beetlestone wrote that the ban is “undoubtedly an inconvenience” but said in denying the request “they will still be able to create, publish, and share content for their millions of current followers.”

A separate legal challenge from TikTok and Chinese owner ByteDance

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Judge sets TikTok hearing for Sunday amid looming ban

Sept. 26 (UPI) — A federal judge has set a hearing for Sunday morning to decide on the fate of the video-sharing app TikTok ahead of Trump’s ban slated to take effect by midnight of the same day.

U.S. District Judge Carl Nichols scheduled the hearing to decide whether or not the United States has the authority to ban the app after the video-sharing app’s owner ByteDance asked the court to block the ban, arguing in court filings that the ban would impede constitutional free-speech protections.

President Donald Trump’s administration initially scheduled the ban against TikTok to take effect last Sunday, but it was delayed to this upcoming Sunday.

The ban slated to take effect by midnight Sunday would remove TikTok from app stores Apple, Google, and Android run and remove access to updates to help make the app move smoothly for millions of Americans who already have the app.

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Judge to hold hearing Sunday on Trump administration’s TikTok download ban

TikTok America

James Martin/CNET

A federal judge is expected to decide on Sunday morning whether to allow the US government to ban new downloads of TikTok in the Apple and Google app stores. The ban would take effect later that same day at 11:59 p.m. ET unless it’s blocked.

The US Justice Department had until Friday to either delay the ban or file legal papers defending it. The DOJ filed a sealed opposition to TikTok’s preliminary injunction to block the ban of the video app.

US District Judge Carl Nichols in Washington, DC, is scheduled to hold a hearing on TikTok’s preliminary injunction request at 9:30 a.m. ET, according to court documents.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order in August that bars any US transactions with TikTok’s Chinese parent

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