Study Suggests A Supernova Exploded Near Earth About 2.5 Million Years Ago, Possibly Causing An Extinction Event

Supernovas are amazingly bright explosions of massive stars at the end of their lives. During the gravitational collapse, the outer layers of the star are pushed away, and chemical elements formed inside the dying star are released into space. This cosmic dust rains down onto the Earth continuously, eventually becoming part of sediments deposited in the sea.

Research published in the journal Physical Review Letters used the concentrations of elements formed in an exploding star and preserved in oceanic sediments to hypothesize that a supernova exploded near Earth just 2.5 million years ago.

The authors, led by Dr. Gunther Korschinek from the Technical University of Munich, focused their study on ferromanganese crusts

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Nasa captures an exploding supernova on camera

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Take a look at this brilliant video from Nasa which shows the star exploding!

Nasa has captured an exploding supernova on camera.

The supernova called SN 2018gv is located around 70 million light-years away from Earth, in the spiral galaxy NGC 2525.

A supernova is a pretty spectacular cosmic event, which happens when a star reaches the end of its life cycle and collapses in on itself.

This causes an incredibly powerful explosion which can send shockwaves across the galaxy, and can even create black holes.

According to Nasa, supernova SN 2018gv unleashed a surge of energy that was five billion suns brighter than our Sun. That’s pretty bright!

The scientists were able to record the exploding star using the Hubble Space Telescope.

galaxy.NASA/ESA/ESA/A. Riess/SH0ES Team

Supernova SN 2018gv can be seen here

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Hubble Space Telescope watches stunning supernova fade over a full year

Tens of millions of years ago, the corpse of a star stole away too much gas from a neighbor and exploded, becoming a beacon in the cosmos — one that took a full year to fade away.

Fortunately for scientists, the massive stellar explosion, called supernova 2018gv, took place 70 million light-years away, and the Hubble Space Telescope was in prime position to watch the lightshow. Astronomers used the instrument to create a timelapse showing the supernova’s year-long fade, from February 2018, shortly after the explosion was first detected, through February 2019.

“No Earthly fireworks display can compete with this supernova, captured in its fading glory by the Hubble Space Telescope,” Adam Riess, an astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute and Johns Hopkins University in Maryland and leader of the team behind the new footage, said in a statement.

Related: The best Hubble Space Telescope images of

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Discovery of iron-60 and manganese-53 substantiates supernova 2.5 million years ago — ScienceDaily

When the brightness of the star Betelgeuse dropped dramatically a few months ago, some observers suspected an impending supernova — a stellar explosion that could also cause damage on Earth. While Betelgeuse has returned to normal, physicists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have found evidence of a supernova that exploded near the Earth around 2.5 million years ago.

The life of stars with a mass more than ten times that of our sun ends in a supernova, a colossal stellar explosion. This explosion leads to the formation of iron, manganese and other heavy elements.

In layers of a manganese crust that are around two and a half million years old a research team led by physicists from the Technical University of Munich has now confirmed the existence of both iron-60 and manganese-53.

“The increased concentrations of manganese-53 can be taken as the “smoking gun” — the ultimate proof

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