Do ripples on the surface of the sun tell us that a flare is coming?

Do ripples on the surface of the sun tell us that a flare is coming?
Solar flares produce waves with paths that bend up to the surface, revealing themselves as ripples on the surface. Credit: UC Berkeley/Juan Camilo Buitrago-Casas

Flares from the sun are some of the nastiest things in the solar system. When the sun flares, it belches out intense X-ray radiation (and sometimes even worse). Predicting solar flares is a tricky job, and a new research paper sheds light on a possible new technique: looking for telltale ripples in the surface of the sun minutes before the blast comes.


The sun’s magnetic fields are usually nice and calm, but they can become tangled up with each other. When they do, they store a massive amount of energy. And when they finally snap, it’s like a giant Earth-sized rubber band reaching the breaking point. These events are known as solar flares, and they are one of the most energetic events in the solar system.

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The Latest Microsoft Surface Pro and More Top-Rated Laptops Are on Major Sale for Prime Day

Amazon

With many schools adapting to an online-only curriculum and work from home becoming increasingly more common, this year has proven to be quite a time for computers. Now more than ever, having a reliable laptop is a worthwhile investment.

Luckily, this year’s Amazon Prime Day shopping event has followed through with impressive deals on tech essentials to make the adjustment to this new lifestyle a bit smoother. Along with steep markdowns on iPads, laptops are another sale shoppers are scrambling to take advantage of: Like the one on the latest Microsoft Surface Pro 7 laptop, which you can get for $229 off right now. 

Best Microsoft Surface Pro and Laptop Deals:

  • Microsoft Surface Pro 7 (10th Generation), $1,170 (orig. $1,399)

  • Microsoft Surface Pro 6, $729.99 (orig. $899)

  • Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 (10th Generation), $1,133.05 (orig. $1,299)

  • Apple MacBook Air (13-inch), $899.99 (orig. $999)

  • Apple MacBook Pro (13-inch), $1,699.99 (orig.

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iPhone 12: Renders surface before Apple’s official smartphone reveal

Apple will unwrap the new iPhone in just a few hours during its online event ‘Hi, Speed’ and leaks of what the smartphone could look like have surfaced.

The launch, which is set for 1pm ET, is set to unveil four models of the flagship handset, ranging in price from $699 to $1,099.

Notably smartphone leaker, Evan Blass, released renders of the devices, showing the iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max.

Although the render are of only the fronts and backs, they do confirm several details that have been rumored about the smartphones.

The images show a new blue color that is set for the higher-end devices, along with a look at the new LIDAR sensor.

Although Apple has yet to reveal details of the iPhone 12, it is speculated that it will cost $799 and be available for pre-order on either

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Surface waves can help nanostructured devices keep their cool

Surface waves can help nanostructured devices keep their cool
A research team led by the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo finds that hybrid surface waves called surface phonon-polaritons can conduct heat away from nanoscale material structures Credit: Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo

Due to the continuing progress in miniaturization of silicon microelectronic and photonic devices, the cooling of device structures is increasingly challenging. Conventional heat transport in bulk materials is dominated by acoustic phonons, which are quasiparticles that represent the material’s lattice vibrations, similar to the way that photons represent light waves. Unfortunately, this type of cooling is reaching its limits in these tiny structures.


However, surface effects become dominant as the materials in nanostructured devices become thinner, which means that surface waves may provide the thermal transport solution required. Surface phonon-polaritons (SPhPs) – hybrid waves composed of surface electromagnetic waves and optical phonons that propagate along the surfaces of dielectric membranes—have shown

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Surface waves can help nanostructured devices keep their cool — ScienceDaily

The continuing progress in miniaturization of silicon microelectronic and photonic devices is causing cooling of the device structures to become increasingly challenging. Conventional heat transport in bulk materials is dominated by acoustic phonons, which are quasiparticles that represent the material’s lattice vibrations, similar to the way that photons represent light waves. Unfortunately, this type of cooling is reaching its limits in these tiny structures.

However, surface effects become dominant as the materials in nanostructured devices become thinner, which means that surface waves may provide the thermal transport solution required. Surface phonon-polaritons (SPhPs) — hybrid waves composed of surface electromagnetic waves and optical phonons that propagate along the surfaces of dielectric membranes — have shown particular promise, and a team led by researchers from the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo has now demonstrated and verified the thermal conductivity enhancements provided by these waves.

“We generated SPhPs on silicon

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Scientists develop new land surface model to monitor global river water environment

yangtze river
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Climate change and human activities, including heat emission, nitrogen (N) emission and water management, are altering the hydrothermal condition and N transport in the soil and river systems, thereby affecting the global nitrogen cycle and water environment.


“We need to assess the impacts of these human activities on global river temperature and riverine N transport,” said Prof. Xie Zhenghui from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. “Quantitative assessment can not only improve our understanding of the material and energy cycle that occur in response to anthropogenic disturbances, but also contribute to protecting river ecosystems.”

Xie and his collaborators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences incorporated the schemes of riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) transport, river water temperature, and human activity into a land surface model, and thus developed a land surface model CAS-LSM. They applied the model to explore the impacts

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Moon May Harbor Ancient Pieces Of Venus’ Surface

Two Yale University researchers have found a potential shortcut in sampling Venus’ ancient surface. Instead of sending a probe on a costly and extraordinarily challenging Venus sample return mission, they propose simply finding a Venusian meteorite on our own Moon.

There’s never been a bona fide detection of a Venusian meteorite on Earth. For one reason, that’s because in the last several hundred million years at least, Venus’ atmospheric pressures have been so intense that even a catastrophic impactor could not dislodge any Venusian rocks into space. 

But before Venus underwent a runaway greenhouse and morphed into the climatic hellhole it is today, it may have had liquid water oceans as late as 700

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What tiny surfing robots teach us about surface tension — ScienceDaily

Spend an afternoon by a creek in the woods, and you’re likely to notice water striders — long-legged insects that dimple the surface of the water as they skate across. Or, dip one side of a toothpick in dish detergent before placing it in a bowl of water, and impress your grade schooler as the toothpick gently starts to move itself across the surface.

Both situations illustrate the concepts of surface tension and propulsion velocity. At Michigan Technological University, mechanical engineer Hassan Masoud and PhD student Saeed Jafari Kang have applied the lessons of the water strider and the soapy toothpick to develop an understanding of chemical manipulation of surface tension.

Their vehicle? Tiny surfing robots.

“During the past few decades, there have been many efforts to fabricate miniature robots, especially swimming robots,” said Masoud, an assistant professor in the mechanical engineering-engineering mechanics department. “Much less work has been done

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Scientists study the rugged surface of near-Earth asteroid Bennu — ScienceDaily

As the days count down to NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft’s Touch-And-Go asteroid sample collection attempt, Southwest Research Institute scientists have helped determine what the spacecraft can expect to return from the near-Earth asteroid Bennu’s surface. Three papers published online by Science on Oct. 8 discuss the color, reflectivity, age, composition, origin and distribution of materials that make up the asteroid’s rough surface.

On October 20, the spacecraft will descend to the asteroid’s boulder-strewn surface, touch the ground with its robotic arm for a few seconds and collect a sample of rocks and dust — marking the first time NASA has grabbed pieces of an asteroid for return to Earth. SwRI scientists played a role in the selection of the sample sites. The first attempt will be made at Nightingale, a rocky area 66 feet in diameter in Bennu’s northern hemisphere. If this historic attempt is unsuccessful, the spacecraft will try again

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Perseverance Rover will peer beneath Mars’ surface

Perseverance Rover Will Peer Beneath Mars' Surface
Perseverance’s Radar Imager for Mars’ Subsurface Experiment (RIMFAX) uses radar waves to probe the ground, revealing the unexplored world that lies beneath the Martian surface. The first ground-penetrating radar set on the surface of Mars, RIMFAX can provide a highly detailed view of subsurface structures down to at least 30 feet (10 meters) underground. In doing so, the instrument will reveal hidden layers of geology and help find clues to past environments on Mars, especially those with conditions necessary for supporting life. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/FFI

After touching down on the Red Planet Feb. 18, 2021, NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover will scour Jezero Crater to help us understand its geologic history and search for signs of past microbial life. But the six-wheeled robot won’t be looking just at the surface of Mars: The rover will peer deep below it with a ground-penetrating radar called RIMFAX.


Unlike similar instruments aboard Mars orbiters,

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