Watch: Visual surveillance technology – The Hindu

A video on how Visual surveillance technology that help users monitor and identify people is becoming popular within homes.

Visual surveillance technology refers to all those devices that help users monitor and identify people. It includes cameras and facial recognition systems.

Offices and large residential complexes have been using CCTV cameras to monitor people but today, cameras within homes are also becoming increasingly popular.

Households are installing both outdoor and indoor security cameras. While outdoor cameras are used to recognise and keep a watch on visitors and passers-by, indoor cameras help in monitoring activities in separate rooms like baby rooms or for the elderly.

These cameras help ensure safety and they allow households to keep track of activities both outside and inside the houses.

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Cisco security warning: Patch Webex Teams for Windows and surveillance camera now

Cisco has released security updates for high-severity security flaws affecting Webex Teams for Windows, its Identity Services Engine, and Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras. 

In this month’s first round of security updates from Cisco, the most serious vulnerability addressed is a remote code-execution (RCE) and denial-of-service (DoS) bug affecting its Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras.

The flaw, tracked as CVE-2020-3544, has a severity rating of 8.8 out of 10, on par with similar RCE and DoS flaws it disclosed in August affecting the Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras. 

SEE: Security Awareness and Training policy (TechRepublic Premium)

Both sets of vulnerabilities were reported by Qian Chen of Qihoo 360 Nirvan Team and both concern flaws in the Cisco Discovery Protocol, a Layer 2 or data link layer protocol in the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) networking model. 

Similarly, both are due to “missing checks when an IP camera processes

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Twitter says monitoring service does not violate surveillance ban

Twitter said Tuesday a service that monitors tweets for police, alerting them to brewing social justice protests and more, does not break the platform’s ban on being used for surveillance.

Twitter defended letting the service, Dataminr, tap into the flow of public tweets to send alerts to police or other government agencies about plans for protests or civil disobedience, such as those involved in the Black Lives Matter movement.

“Twitter prohibits the use of our developer services for surveillance purposes. Period,” a spokesman for the San Francisco-based company said in reply to an AFP inquiry.

“We see a societal benefit in public Twitter data being used for news alerting, first responder support, and disaster relief.”

The stance provokes a debate as to what exactly constitutes surveillance.

Dataminr is a social media-monitoring service that uses artificial intelligence to comb platforms such as Twitter for user-determined keywords.

In recent months, Dataminr has

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Russian surveillance tech startup NtechLab nets $13M from sovereign wealth funds

NtechLab, a startup that helps analyze footage captured by Moscow’s 100,000 surveillance cameras, just closed an investment of more than 1RUB billion ($13 million) to further global expansion.

The five-year-old company sells software that recognizes faces, silhouettes and actions on videos. It’s able to do so on a vast scale in real time, allowing clients to react promptly to situations It’s a key “differentiator” of the company, co-founder Artem Kukharenko told TechCrunch.

“There could be systems which can process, for example, 100 cameras. When there are a lot of cameras in a city, [these systems] connect 100 cameras from one part of the city, then disconnect them and connect another hundred cameras in another part of the city, so it’s not so interesting,” he suggested.

The latest round, financed by Russia’s sovereign wealth fund, the Russian Direct Investment Fund, and an undisclosed sovereign wealth fund from the Middle East, certainly

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Amazon’s home drone sparks surveillance fears, but it may be the least-invasive thing Amazon makes

  • Amazon on Thursday unveiled a camera-mounted drone that can fly around inside your house, called the Ring Always Home Cam.
  • The drone can launch itself from its base and automatically patrol your house if it’s alerted to a disturbance by a paired Ring alarm.
  • The announcement prompted privacy fears around the increased incursion by big tech surveillance products into people’s homes.
  •  The tiny drone is arguably one of Amazon’s less invasive products.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amazon’s latest security wheeze — a miniature drone that flies around your home looking for burglars — has prompted horrified responses about the potential for increased Big Tech surveillance.

Amazon unveiled the Ring Always Home Cam on Thursday, a tiny drone that can fly around your home and check for disturbances.

The $250 device sits inside the home in a cradle, and will launch itself if triggered by a paired Ring

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