Alion Awarded $73 Million Task Order to Provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment Research and Development

WASHINGTON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Navy has awarded Alion Science and Technology a $73 million task order with a 60-month period of performance to provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment (JTSE) Research and Development (R&D) for Joint Staff J7, Deputy Director Joint Training (JS J7 DDJT) Environment Architecture Division (EAD). Alion was awarded this contract under the Department of Defense Information Analysis Center’s (DoD IAC) multiple-award contract (MAC) vehicle. These DoD IAC MAC task orders (TOs) are awarded by the U.S. Air Force’s 774th Enterprise Sourcing Squadron to develop and create new knowledge for the enhancement of the DTIC repository and the R&D and S&T community.

“We are dedicated to our continued customer partnership to develop joint virtual environments to prepare for Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2),” said Katie Selbe, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Alion’s Cyber Network Solutions Group. “Alion has

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Nanoparticles with synthetic DNA can control release of active agents — ScienceDaily

Medications often have unwanted side-effects. One reason is that they reach not only the unhealthy cells for which they are intended, but also reach and have an impact on healthy cells. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), working together with the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, have developed a stable nano-carrier for medications. A special mechanism makes sure the drugs are only released in diseased cells.

The human body is made up of billions of cells. In the case of cancer, the genome of several of these cells is changed pathologically so that the cells divide in an uncontrolled manner. The cause of virus infections is also found within the affected cells. During chemotherapy for example, drugs are used to try to destroy these cells. However, the therapy impacts the entire body, damaging healthy cells as well and resulting in side effects which are sometimes quite

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Synthetic aperture radar finally shedding its mystique

When Capella Space’s first operational synthetic aperture radar satellite launched from New Zealand last month on a Rocket Lab Electron, a team of agriculture specialists at The Climate Corporation watched with excitement.

“We were really happy,” said Steven Ward, the director of geospatial sciences at The Climate Corporation, a San Francisco-based subsidiary of life sciences and pharmaceutical giant Bayer that leverages satellite imagery to help farmers boost crop yields and insure against weather-driven losses. “We actually had a Slack channel where we were celebrating that launch.”

The Climate Corporation processed 600 million satellite images in 2019, most of it optical, Ward said. The company hasn’t integrated synthetic aperture radar, or SAR, imagery into its Climate FieldView product line yet, but is studying how radar, which can peer through clouds, could fill gaps left by optical satellites over notoriously cloudy regions like Brazil, Indonesia and the Niger delta, he said.

“We’re

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