Ada Lovelace Day – tackling the toxic tech ‘bro culture’

Ada Lovelace Day, which is held on the second Tuesday of October each year, is meant to be a vehicle to celebrate women’s achievements in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). 

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the annual live event at London’s Institution of Engineering and Technology moving online this year, its laudable aim is to promote potential new role models in order to encourage girls to embark on a STEM career and encourage those already in one to stay.

But the reasons for them choosing to do so are not necessarily very clear if the findings of a report by Women Who Tech entitled ‘The State of Women in Tech and Startups’ are to be believed. The study reveals that a huge 48% of the 1,000 or so females interviewed have experienced some form of harassment, with 63% of those affected being subjected to sexism and 43%

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Longhorns plan to continue drill tackling after defensive struggles in win over Texas Tech

Here are three takeaways from Tom Herman’s appearance on Monday’s Big 12 coaches teleconference.

Tackling work starts now

Texas defensive coordinator Chris Ash’s return to Big 12 play quickly turned into a long day at the office. The Longhorn defense allowed 441 total yards in Saturday’s win over Texas Tech. Poor tackling in the second half allowed the Red Raiders to storm in front late in the fourth quarter.

Herman said that whatever number of missed tackles they had Saturday, it was too many.

“You just practice,” Herman said. “You go through all your tackling drills, you add more into your body of practice. But in 2020 it’s not like we’re going to be lining up against our offense and running full-speed scrimmages just to get better at tackling. So we’ve got to find a way to do it in drill work.”

Ash’s reintroduction to Big 12 offenses didn’t go

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Climate pledges ‘like tackling COVID-19 without social distancing’ — ScienceDaily

Current global pledges to tackle climate change are the equivalent of declaring a pandemic without a plan for social distancing, researchers say.

In the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to limit global warming to “well below 2°C.”

But University of Exeter scientists say governments are engaged in “climate hypocrisy” by publicly supporting the agreement while subsidising the fossil fuel industry, destroying forests and pursuing other harmful policies.

Writing in the journal Global Sustainability, they highlight two other crises — ozone depletion and the COVID-19 pandemic — and call for similar action on the climate crisis.

The call comes as world leaders including UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson discuss climate action and a “sustainable recovery” from the pandemic at the UN General Assembly.

“Restoring the ozone layer and minimising the COVID-19 pandemic both required governments to enact specific legislation to address the precise causes of these problems,” said Professor Mark Baldwin,

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