‘Two Screens for Teachers’ to supply extra monitors in Seattle and puts out call for help in other cities

The two-screen setup of an elementary school teacher in Seattle. (Photo courtesy of Two Screens for Teachers)

Remote teaching is about to get a little bit easier for thousands of teachers in Seattle Public Schools. The nonprofit organization “Two Screens for Teachers” announced Tuesday that it’s purchasing a second computer monitor for every teacher who needs one, and plans to deliver about 3,000 monitors at a value of around $430,000.

Started by a small group of Seattle startup veterans, Two Screens for Teachers aims to boost teacher productivity through added technology, helping to make remote instruction less stressful during the ongoing pandemic.

Matt Lerner and Mike Mathieu are behind the idea. They previously co-founded Walk Score, a Seattle startup that sold to Redfin in 2014. Their hope is that their latest cause will spread beyond Seattle and they can inspire techies in other cities to purchase monitors for the thousands

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Teachers play a critical role in shaping girls’ future as coders

The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.

The big idea

It doesn’t take long to help girls see a future for themselves in computer science, but it depends largely on how good their teachers are at recognizing the skills the girls have in coding, which is basically writing language for computers. We found that girls ages 10 to 12 can come to see themselves as coders in as little as a week. And there are diverse roles within the world of coding that allow girls with various personalities and skill sets to see themselves as coders. However, if educators recognize girls only for when they play a background role and help others, but not when they are more assertive and confident, then they may not develop their assertiveness and confidence in a way that enables them to succeed as coders.

To reach this conclusion, my colleagues

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EASI: Bringing science and tech to students and teachers | Local News Stories

For over a decade local science teachers have banded together to form the Eastern Arizona Science Initiative. Together, these educators put on annual Science, Technology, Engineering and Math summer camps and provide teacher support.

Paul Anger is the EASI chairperson and one of the creators of the non-profit group in 2008. Anger is also the director for the Eastern Arizona College Discovery Park campus, where the group holds their meetings and multiple youth summer camp activities.

“Teachers meet once a month to go over planning activities to help each other as teachers. A big factor is the extracurricular activities during the summer for the youth,” Anger said. “The idea is Discovery Park will be the hub of science and STEM activity of Graham and Greenlee County.”

Anger said over the years the initiative’s summer STEM camps have grown in popularity. While the cost of attending the three to four-day camps

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Why are some teachers being told not to use it?

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) contact tracing smartphone app of Britain's National Health Service (NHS) is displayed on an iPhone
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) contact tracing smartphone app of Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) is displayed on an iPhone

Two weeks in, the NHS Covid-19 app for England and Wales seems to have got off to a good start, with more than 16 million downloads so far – but a range of employers are actively discouraging their staff from using it.

Earlier this week, both the pharmaceuticals company GlaxoSmithKline and a Hull-based fuel supplier told staff the app should be switched off at work – both said it was unnecessary in their “Covid-secure” workplaces.

And now, there are numerous reports teachers are being told they should not use the app in school.

I have received a message from a teacher in north-west England who wants to remain anonymous.

Triggered alerts

This person downloaded the app on the day it was released and then, last Monday, tested positive for coronavirus.

As

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New York City Says It Can’t Afford Teachers’ Back Pay

New York City can’t afford to pay a lump sum due its teachers because of the new coronavirus, city officials said Thursday, reflecting a fiscal crisis that has already led to budget cuts and service reductions.

The city teachers union, which puts the amount due this month at $900 million, called Thursday for immediate arbitration.

First Deputy Mayor Dean Fuleihan sent the union a letter saying the budget impact of the pandemic was “debilitating and not yet fully known,” and the city couldn’t afford to pay a lump sum due to active and retired teachers scheduled for this month under a 2014 agreement.

“It is the City’s desire to avoid the necessity for layoffs, and to make a retroactive payment at this time would therefore be fiscally irresponsible,” Mr. Fuleihan’s letter said.

The dispute comes during a hectic and tense back-to-school season. In August, the union threatened to strike if

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How teachers can better support immigrant students during the pandemic

  • During the pandemic, immigrant students can be disproportionately affected by remote learning due to linguistic, cultural, and economic challenges. 
  • Timothy P. Williams and Avary Carhill-Poza, scholars who study immigration and technology, found that immigrant students often have limited access to WiFi and take on extracurricular responsibilities like working to help support their family. 
  • They suggest teachers leverage technologies to better support bilingual students, nurture their strengths, and adapt to their work schedules. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Schools across the US responded to the COVID-19 pandemic last spring with an unprecedented shift to remote learning — a trend that has continued into the new school year for many districts.

Millions of children now use laptops and tablets at home as part of their daily education. This arrangement is neither ideal nor easy. But immigrant students who are still learning English — often called English learners — face additional

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MPSD purchases new technology for students and teachers

MERIDIAN, Miss. (WTOK) – The Meridian Public School District will be getting extra help making distance learning possible for all students. Funds from the CARES Act and the Equity in Distance Learning Act are being used to purchase new devices for students and teachers.



a person holding a book: MPSD to receive new technology


© Provided by Meridian WTOK-TV
MPSD to receive new technology

“I’m expecting [the new technology] in the next 30-days,” said Tim Boutwell, the director of technology for the Meridian Public School District. “The devices have been ordered a couple weeks ago now, so 30 days gives me about 6 weeks leeway, so I’m expecting them in the next 30 days.”

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K1 students will be receiving iPad’s and students in other grades will be receiving Chromebook’s. Teachers who have not recently been given new laptops will be getting new ones with the funds.

“If we had to close on a moment’s notice for any purpose,

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