Innovation Inc: Walmart’s AI vendors, Securus Tech’s digital overhaul

We often highlight stories of digital overhauls that enable faster business growth, deeper operational cost cuts, and more seamless interactions with customers. 

But there’s another component to transformations, too: reputation. 

Walmart, for example, is investing heavily in technology, both as part of its epic battle with Amazon for retail dominance and from a desire to be viewed as a software behemoth. The company works with a slew of outside vendors, but is developing many of applications in-house, as well — like its recent express delivery option. The overhaul is so robust that some Wall Street analysts believe Walmart’s stock should be treated more like that of a tech company.

In the case of Aventiv Technologies — the parent-firm of prison communications company Securus Technologies that’s backed by billionaire Tom Gores — new CEO Dave Abel is relying on a digital overhaul to rebuild a tattered public image. 

Securus has faced

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Four takeaways: Virginia Tech’s loss at North Carolina | College Sports

New coordinator Justin Hamilton, who finally got to call a game in his new job Saturday, will need to figure out some answers before Tech’s next game, against an offensively-rejuvenated Boston College team.

2) The offense is better with Hooker: Last year’s starting quarterback, Hendon Hooker finally got on the field in 2020 and he showed what he brings to the offense. Going into the game, Braxton Burmeister, Tech’s starter in the first two wins, had a completion percentage under 45% and the Hokies were just 10 for 33 on third-down.

Last season, Hooker completed over 60% of his throws and Saturday, after Hooker took over, Tech went 2 for 4 on third downs in the second half.

Hooker finished 7 for 13 for 136 yards and two touchdowns.

3) Herbert is the Hokies identity: For reasons that are hard to explain, Virginia Tech’s play calling largely ignored the ACC’s

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Big tech’s emerging market finance push brings rewards and risk

LONDON: A push by big technology firms into financial services in developing countries will improve access to them, but might also make traditional lenders more vulnerable, the Financial Stability Board (FSB) said.

The expansion in emerging markets has generally been more rapid and broad-based than that in advanced economies, the FSB, which coordinates financial regulation for the Group of 20 Economies (G20), said in the report released on Monday.

Lower levels of access to traditional banking and financial services developing economies had created demand for services now offered by big tech firms, the report found, particularly among low-income populations and in rural areas.

An increasing availability of mobile phones and internet access supported this trend, the FSB said.

“However the expansion of BigTech activity also gives rise to risks and vulnerabilities,” it said, pointing to lower financial literacy and firms using other data gathered.

“Competition from BigTech firms may, in

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Big tech’s emerging market finance push brings rewards and risk, FSB says

LONDON, Oct 12 (Reuters) – A push by big technology firms into financial services in developing countries will improve access to them, but might also make traditional lenders more vulnerable, the Financial Stability Board (FSB) said.

The expansion in emerging markets has generally been more rapid and broad-based than that in advanced economies, the FSB, which coordinates financial regulation for the Group of 20 Economies (G20), said in the report released on Monday.

Lower levels of access to traditional banking and financial services developing economies had created demand for services now offered by big tech firms, the report found, particularly among low-income populations and in rural areas.

An increasing availability of mobile phones and internet access supported this trend, the FSB said.

“However the expansion of BigTech activity also gives rise to risks and vulnerabilities,” it said, pointing to lower financial literacy and firms using other data gathered.

“Competition from

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Are Tech’s Big Four Smart Enough to Break Themselves Up?

House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee Chair David Cicilline.
Photo: Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images

Buried in the one of the most chaotic news cycles of the year, earlier this week the House Judiciary Committee published a report based on its 15-month investigation into the antitrust potential of tech’s big four: Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon. “To put it simply, companies that once were scrappy, underdog startups that challenged the status quo have become the kinds of monopolies we last saw in the era of oil barons and railroad tycoons,” the 449-page report from the antitrust subcommittee states. “They not only wield tremendous power, but they also abuse it by charging exorbitant fees, imposing oppressive contract terms, and extracting valuable data from the people and businesses that rely on them.”

On the most recent episode of the New York podcast Pivot, co-hosts Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway consider the massive investigation and why the

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U.S. lawmakers detail Big Tech’s market abuses and press for strict reform

(Reuters) – A U.S. House of Representatives panel looking into abuses of market power by four of the biggest technology companies found they used “killer acquisitions” to smite rivals, charged exorbitant fees and forced small businesses into “oppressive” contracts in the name of profit.

The antitrust subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee recommended that Alphabet Inc’s GOOGL.O Google, Apple Inc AAPL.O, Amazon.com AMZN.O and Facebook FB.O should not both control and compete in related businesses, but stopped short of saying a specific company should be broken up.

The scathing 449-page report described dozens of instances where the companies misused their power, revealing corporate cultures apparently bent on doing what they could to maintain dominance over large portions of the internet.

“To put it simply, companies that once were scrappy, underdog startups that challenged the status quo have become the kinds of monopolies we last saw

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After one of tech’s biggest conferences for women postponed its career fair, attendees organized their own with recruiters from companies like Apple and Google



a sign on a stage in front of a crowd: The Grace Hopper Celebration is the world's largest conference for women in computing. Anitab.org


© Anitab.org
The Grace Hopper Celebration is the world’s largest conference for women in computing. Anitab.org

  • Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC), one of the largest conferences for women in tech, recently postponed its annual career fair due to technical difficulties.
  • Many students rely on the career fair as a way to land jobs and internships at some of the biggest tech companies like Apple and Google. 
  • In response, some attendees have come together to arrange an alternative option for candidates and recruiters to connect. 
  • Companies like Dropbox, are also hosting their own live interactive networking events and 1:1 chats to meet conference attendees and recruit diverse candidates. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC) is one of the largest conferences for women in tech.

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The event boasts more than 30,000 participants and over 300 partners from major tech companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, and

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Is the IPO Market Stealing Big Tech’s Thunder?

Investors were dumping FAANG stocks again Friday and there just may be some very plausible explanations as to why that’s happening after an apparent rebound from a correction over and done with.

FAANG stocks fell 13% in a span of several weeks in September. Valuations were in re-rate mode as at-home growth services like cloud computing, data center storage, e-commerce and streaming may have seen a massive demand pulled forward from later years in the maturity cycle of these businesses. Friday, FAANG stocks were down more than 2% by 2:15 PM EDT. Cyclical stocks, on a day which employment figures missed estimates and caused some investor anxiety in the morning about the speed of the economic recovery, mostly rose. And the 10-Year Treasury yield rose to as much as 0.70% from 0.67%. That indicates growing inflation expectations, which indicates a recovering economy and means investors do not have to take

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Anti-drone tech’s tangled regulatory landscape

Staff test a system to keep drones away from Beijing Daxing International Airport on July 12, 2019, before putting the technology into service.

The market, and the military, have yet to settle on the best way to stop a drone.

Relatively small, easy-to-acquire drones have been implicated in everything from attempted political assassinations, to airspace incursions that have forced major airports to shut down, to smuggling contraband into prisons. The widespread availability of easy-to-pilot drones with good camera capabilities raises security issues that have fueled a growing market for technology to stop such remotely piloted aircraft.

While regulations for the flying of drones are far more settled in 2020 than they were in 2010, the regulatory landscape for technology to stop them is more unsettled. While many technologies exist that can variously track, identify, and disable drones in flight, these countermeasures risk either jeopardizing communications, violating Federal Communications Commission rules,

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Asia M&A seen cementing rebound as techs, conglomerates step up restructuring

By Kane Wu

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Asia-Pacific mergers and acquisitions are forecast by bankers to remain buoyant after surging 63% in the third quarter, driven by technology companies and conglomerates making strategic moves as they emerge from the pandemic.

Japanese companies are at the forefront of the M&A boom, as shown by SoftBank Group’s <9984.T> $40 billion sale announcement of chip maker ARM to Nvidia <NVDA.O> and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp’s (NTT) <9432.T> launch this week of a $40 billion buyout of its wireless carrier business.

Deals involving Asia companies totalled $432 billion in the July-September quarter, the highest for the period in at least the past decade, according to Refinitiv data. They totalled

$844 billion in the first nine months of the year, up 13% and compared to a 20% decrease globally for the period.

A strong outlook for M&A in Asia, with big markets such as

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