Mars Is At Its Best This Week Until 2052. Here’s How You Can Get A Close-Up In A YouTube Telescope

Can you see Mars at night? Yes—right now you can see Mars from Earth by looking due east as soon as the Sun sets in the west. Mars is today at opposition so as bright as it ever gets. 

However, if you want to get an extra-special close-up then Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona is streaming a special “Virtual Mars Series” of planet-gazing events on YouTube.

During these live webcasts you’ll be able to see real-time close-ups of the red planet through a huge 14-inch “virtual telescope.” 

MORE FROM FORBESStop Looking For An ‘Earth 2.0,’ Say Scientists As They Detect An Even Better ‘Superhabitable’ World

How, when and where to see live close-ups of Mars streaming on YouTube

The observatory is running three sessions on YouTube . Its “Virtual Mars Series” is free and open to

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James Webb Telescope Completes Environmental Tests, A ‘Monumental’ Step Towards Launch

KEY POINTS

  • James Webb Space Telescope finally completed the series of environmental tests
  • It recently passed the tests to make sure that it will survive the launch in 2021
  • The tests simulated what it will likely experience on launch day

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST or Webb) recently passed milestone tests. The all-important environment tests help ensure that the telescope will survive the trip to space.

It was only in August when Webb passed what’s called the “Ground Segment Test,” which made sure that it will be able to respond to the commands from Earth and also send back valuable data once in space.

In a NASA news release, on Tuesday, the agency said that Webb just passed more milestone tests, this time to ensure that it will survive the launch aboard an Ariane 5 rocket in October 2021.

The recent tests are called the “acoustic” and

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Sharpness of star-forming image matches expected resolution of Webb Space Telescope — ScienceDaily

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is still more than a year from launching, but the Gemini South telescope in Chile has provided astronomers a glimpse of what the orbiting observatory should deliver.

Using a wide-field adaptive optics camera that corrects for distortion from Earth’s atmosphere, Rice University’s Patrick Hartigan and Andrea Isella and Dublin City University’s Turlough Downes used the 8.1-meter telescope to capture near-infrared images of the Carina Nebula with the same resolution that’s expected of the Webb Telescope.

Hartigan, Isella and Downes describe their work in a study published online this week in Astrophysical Journal Letters. Their images, gathered over 10 hours in January 2018 at the international Gemini Observatory, a program of the National Science Foundation’s NOIRLab, show part of a molecular cloud about 7,500 light years from Earth. All stars, including Earth’s sun, are thought to form within molecular clouds.

“The results are stunning,” Hartigan

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Hubble Space Telescope watches stunning supernova fade over a full year

Tens of millions of years ago, the corpse of a star stole away too much gas from a neighbor and exploded, becoming a beacon in the cosmos — one that took a full year to fade away.

Fortunately for scientists, the massive stellar explosion, called supernova 2018gv, took place 70 million light-years away, and the Hubble Space Telescope was in prime position to watch the lightshow. Astronomers used the instrument to create a timelapse showing the supernova’s year-long fade, from February 2018, shortly after the explosion was first detected, through February 2019.

“No Earthly fireworks display can compete with this supernova, captured in its fading glory by the Hubble Space Telescope,” Adam Riess, an astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute and Johns Hopkins University in Maryland and leader of the team behind the new footage, said in a statement.

Related: The best Hubble Space Telescope images of

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NASA’s Hubble Telescope saw a gigantic, exploding star disappear into the void

Hubble observed a supernova on the outer edge of spiral galaxy NGC 2525. 


NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team Acknowledgment: M. Zamani (ESA/Hubble)

Titanic, runaway thermonuclear explosion. A disappearing act. Nature’s atomic bomb. NASA sure knows how to describe a supernova, the final moments of a star’s existence.

Seventy-million light-years away in the scenic spiral galaxy NGC 2525, a white dwarf exploded and the Hubble Space Telescope witnessed its last days. NASA and the European Space Agency, which jointly run Hubble, released a rare time-lapse of the supernova’s fading brightness. 

The space telescope first started watching the supernova, named SN 2018gv, in February 2018. The time-lapse covers almost a year of Hubble observations.

The supernova initially outshone the other stars in its host galaxy. “When a star unleashes as much energy

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NASA’s Hubble Telescope sees huge exploding star disappear into the void

Titanic, runaway thermonuclear explosion. A disappearing act. Nature’s atomic bomb. NASA sure knows how to describe a supernova, the final moments of a star’s existence.



a star filled sky: Hubble observed a supernova on the outer edge of spiral galaxy NGC 2525. NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team Acknowledgment: M. Zamani (ESA/Hubble)


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Hubble observed a supernova on the outer edge of spiral galaxy NGC 2525. NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team Acknowledgment: M. Zamani (ESA/Hubble)

Seventy-million light-years away in the scenic spiral galaxy NGC 2525, a white dwarf exploded and the Hubble Space Telescope witnessed its last days. NASA and the European Space Agency, which jointly run Hubble, released a rare time-lapse of the supernova’s fading brightness. 

The space telescope first started watching the supernova, named SN 2018gv, in February 2018. The time-lapse covers almost a year of Hubble observations.

The supernova initially outshone the other stars in its host galaxy. “When a star unleashes as much energy in a matter of days as our sun does in several

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Very Large Telescope finds 6 galaxies trapped in web of supermassive black hole

Oct. 1 (UPI) — Using the Very Large Telescope, a powerful observatory in Chile, astronomers have identified six galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole when the universe was just 900 million years old.

The discovery, described Thursday in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics, helps explain how supermassive black holes got so big so soon after the Big Bang.

“This research was mainly driven by the desire to understand some of the most challenging astronomical objects — supermassive black holes in the early universe,” lead study author Marco Mignoli said in a news release.

“These are extreme systems and to date we have had no good explanation for their existence,” said Mignoli, an astronomer at the National Institute for Astrophysics in Italy.

The findings lend support to the theory that web-like structures of gas fueled the rapid growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe. When

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How NASA’s New Telescope Will Help Astronomers Discover Free-Floating Worlds | Science

As astronomers discover more and more planets in galaxies far, far away, they are increasingly confronted with a curious subset of orbs that are free-floating and not connected to or orbiting a particular star. Further complicating matters is that within that group, most of what they have found are gassy, Jupiter-sized (read: large), planets; few resemble rockier planets like our own Earth.

First discovered in 2003, these potential free-floating planets are elusive and difficult to detect from the existing ground-based observatories.

Soon, however, a revolutionary new telescope launching in 2025 may be able unlock the secrets of the darkness of space, where sunless worlds may even outnumber the stars. NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will be able to see even more rocky free-floating planets, potentially hundreds as small as Mars, according to research published this August in the Astronomical Journal. These lightless worlds can shine light on how

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Stunning images from Hubble, Chandra, and more reveal value of space telescope teamwork

What do you get when you put a space telescope to work with another space telescope or two? Amazing compilation images of our universe.

NASA recently highlighted some collaborations between its Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, particularly the Hubble Space Telescope, showing what sorts of images can be produced when you look at the same object in different wavelengths of light.

Gallery: Amazing nebula photos from Chandra & Hubble

M82

(Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC; Optical: NASA/STScI)

The galaxy M82 can be seen edge-on from Earth, allowing scientists a great perspective whenever star formation occurs, since there is little to block our view. Chandra observations, visible in blue and pink, show bursts of high temperatures created when gas is heated by supernova explosions. The Hubble Space Telescope’s optical images (shown in red and orange) reveal the galaxy’s shape.

Abell 2744

(Image credit: NASA/CXC; Optical: NASA/STScI)

The galaxy cluster

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