Judge temporarily blocks Trump’s order banning TikTok downloads

A US judge has ruled that a ban on TikTok ordered by the Trump administration will not go into effect as planned today (via CNBC). The decision means that the app will remain available to Americans for new downloads on Android and iOS stores. However, the reprieve will be temporary while the court determines the legality of the ban and whether it poses a risk to national security, as the White House has charged.

Shortly before the ban was set to take effect, US district judge Carl Nichols granted the preliminary injunction sought by TikTok owner ByteDance. However, the court declined to halt additional restrictions set to take effect on November 12th that would have effectively killed the app in the US.

“The government will comply with the injunction and has taken immediate steps to do so, but intends to vigorously defend the [executive order] and the Secretary’s implementation

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Judge temporarily halts Trump administration’s TikTok ban

A U.S. federal judge on Sunday partially granted TikTok’s preliminary injunction against a Trump administration order to ban downloads of the app, though more sweeping restrictions are still on track to take effect in November.

In his order, Judge Carl Nichols of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia said the temporary relief does not cover a pending service shutdown “at this time,” reports The New York Times.

“We’re pleased that the court agreed with our legal arguments and issued an injunction preventing the implementation of the TikTok app ban,” a spokesman for TikTok told the publication following news of the decision. “We will continue defending our rights for the benefit of our community and employees. At the same time, we will also maintain our ongoing dialogue with the government to turn our proposal, which the president gave his preliminary approval to last weekend,

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Apple will temporarily stop taking a 30 percent cut on Facebook event fees

Earlier this year, Facebook launched a new feature that let small businesses create paid online events. The company framed it as a way of helping organizations struggling with lost revenue during the pandemic, and said that because of the exceptional circumstances, it would not collect any fees on purchases for these events until August 2021.

But the social network also stressed that any payments made on iOS would be subject to Apple’s standard 30 percent platform fees, noting this meant less money for small businesses. As Fidji Simo, head of Facebook’s main app, said at the time: “We asked Apple to reduce its 30% App Store tax or allow us to offer Facebook Pay so we could absorb all costs for businesses struggling during COVID-19. Unfortunately, they dismissed both our requests and [small businesses] will only be paid 70% of their hard-earned revenue.”

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Apple Temporarily Waives 30% Fee for Facebook Paid Live Events, but Not for Gaming Creators

In an unusual move, Apple has agreed to not collect the App Store’s 30% “tax” on purchases made through Facebook’s app for live paid events — but only through the end of 2020. Moreover, Apple will still take a 30% cut of paid livestreams from video-game creators using the paid-livestream feature.

The ongoing clash of tech titans is the latest in the public fight some app developers are waging against Apple over its App Store business practices, which they say are unfair.

Facebook complained that Apple agreed only to a short moratorium on collecting in-app fees for paid live events, which it launched last month. For its part, Facebook says it won’t take a cut of creators or businesses’ revenue for livestreaming events until at least August 2021, citing economic hardships inflicted by the COVD pandemic.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will

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