New McLaren high-performance hybrid supercar enters final testing

After more or less ten months of announcing it, McLaren reports that its new high-performance hybrid supercar is now in its final round of development, which includes running the car on public roads.

Due to launch in the middle of next year, the hybrid supercar represents a new era of electrification for the popular British sports car marque, as production on its Sports Series range nears its end.

The High-Performance Hybrid powertrain is propelled by an all-new V6 internal combustion engine, and will provide medium-range EV-only drive capability. This new, lighter V6 engine, possessing a front axle electric configuration, will reportedly have a 0 to 100kmph acceleration time of 2.38secs.

https://cars.mclaren.press/
https://cars.mclaren.press/

Mike Flewitt, CEO, McLaren Automotive, said that the upcoming hypercar represents everything the company has done to date, and is heavily inspired by their achievements and learnings over the years.

“This is a new kind of McLaren for a

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Can temperature scanning slow COVID-19 spread? Airports are the testing ground for new tech

A camera in the security lines at Dallas Love Field is scanning every passerby for elevated temperatures, in a test by the airport and Southwest Airlines to find out if it can detect sick people before they board flights.

In the back hallways, employees are getting temperature checks at kiosks before they start work each day, trying to keep sick employees out of the airport, too.

As airlines, companies and governments scramble to reopen a battered economy facing the eighth month of a worldwide pandemic, airports are now the frontline for evolving thermal imaging technologies designed to pick out infected travelers before they can spread COVID-19 further.

Temperature scanning device makers such as Dallas-based Wello Inc. and Beaumont’s Infared Cameras Inc. have suddenly been inundated with requests for their technology. Even small restaurants, hotels and schools are asking about it.

“It’s not just convention centers and airlines,” said Gary Strahan,

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Researchers 3D print unique micro-scale fluid channels used for medical testing — ScienceDaily

In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Soldier Center, have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications.

The team is the first to 3D print these structures on a curved surface, providing the initial step for someday printing them directly on the skin for real-time sensing of bodily fluids. The research is published in Science Advances.

Microfluidics is a rapidly growing field involving the control of fluid flows at the micron scale (one millionth of a meter). Microfluidics are used in a wide range of application areas including environmental sensing, medical diagnostics (such as COVID-19 and cancer), pregnancy testing, drug screening and delivery, and other biological assays.

The global microfluidics market value is currently

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Military dogs testing AR goggles to receive handlers’ commands

(CNN) — Dogs working in the United States military could in the future wear augmented reality goggles that enable soldiers to give them remote commands.

The goggles are being developed by Command Sight, a Seattle-based company, with US Army research funding, and would allow military dogs to assist in rescue operations and scout potentially dangerous areas for hazards and explosives while their handlers remain at a safe distance.

The technology, which the US Army says is the first of its kind, works by letting a handler see everything the dog can see and then provide specific commands using visual cues that show up in the dog’s line of vision.

Currently, military dogs are most commonly directed with hand signals or laser pointers, which require the handler to be in close proximity. Handlers can also use audio communication, with a camera and radio attached to the dog, but the commands can

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Aptos Solar Technology’s DNA Modules Pass Extended Reliability Testing

Aptos Solar Technology, a supplier of high-performance solar modules, announces a successful completion of accelerated environmental tests performed by Renewable Energy Testing Center (RETC). The data revealed from testing confirms the reliability of Aptos Solar Technology’s DNATM modules for extreme weather conditions over an extended period of time.

As a leader in defining quality standards for renewable energy products, RETC provides a rigorous series of tests to ensure the durability of solar modules. Achieving recognition by RETC, in addition to holding standard UL & IEC certifications, makes the DNATM module by Aptos Solar Technology a competitive choice for those seeking durability in module performance.

“A high-quality PV module not only demonstrates high performance at standard test conditions but also performs well in real-world conditions over its intended service life. Aptos has shown a continued commitment to module quality and performance by diligently testing their products and ensuring their

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How Rapid COVID-19 Testing Could Immediately Nip Emerging Threats

(TNS) – New COVID-19 tests that can produce results in as little as 15 minutes are expected to become available in the United States as soon as this month, a development that would help could help companies bring workers back to the office and schools bring students into the classroom safely, doctors said.

 

The rapid tests manufactured by medical device companies such as Abbott Labs show promise for accurate, widespread testing, according to researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas A&M. The federal government, which bought the first 150 million tests produced by Abbott, plan to distribute it to states in hope of reopening schools, allowing visitors back to nursing home and making it safer for employees in the workplace.

 

Houston’s medical offices and labs would be able to process the rapid tests, which cost as little as $5.

 

“Where this is going to be extremely helpful are congregant

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Global Food Safety Testing Systems and Services Market to 2025 – Focus on Technology, Target Tested and Food Tested

The “Global Food Safety Testing Systems and Services Market: Focus on – Technology (PCR, Immunoassay, ICP, Chromatography), Target Tested (Pathogens, Residues, Allergen) and Food Tested – Analysis and Forecast, 2019-2025” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The need for food safety originated because of the highly unregulated market, which causes a high number of cases in foodborne illnesses and food recalls. The concern still persists even in current times, with a far more regulated industry that is gaining traction globally. The rising concerns about contamination of food with pathogens and other detrimental elements, has led to a constant need and evolution of the food safety tests at different levels. Also, global concerns and ongoing incidences regarding genetically modified foods, chemical residues, and other similar issues in foods, had a major impact on the policy-making process in different countries.

The globalization in the food industry is the major challenge in

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Addresses major testing need in developing world; also in US, where reagent supplies are again dwindling — ScienceDaily

A major roadblock to large scale testing for coronavirus infection in the developing world is a shortage of key chemicals, or reagents, needed for the test, specifically the ones used to extract the virus’s genetic material, or RNA.

A team of scientists at the University of Vermont, working in partnership with a group at the University of Washington, has developed a method of testing for the COVID-19 virus that doesn’t make use of these chemicals but still delivers an accurate result, paving the way for inexpensive, widely available testing in both developing countries and industrialized nations like the United States, where reagent supplies are again in short supply.

The method for the test, published Oct. 2 in PLOS Biology, omits the step in the widely used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test where the scarce reagents are needed.

92% accuracy, missing only lowest viral loads

The accuracy of

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Opinion | The White House coronavirus outbreak shows that testing alone is not enough

But the castle walls were penetrated — presumably by an asymptomatic carrier, a covid-era Trojan horse — and infections among the president’s circle have cascaded out this week. The spotlight is on the Rose Garden reception for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, an event attended by nearly all of those who have recently tested positive: the president, first lady, senators, aides.

Per protocol, attendees were tested before they got near the president. But other defenses were down. According to The Post: “After guests tested negative that day they were instructed they no longer needed to cover their faces. The no-mask mantra applied indoors as well. Cabinet members, senators, Barrett family members and others mixed unencumbered at tightly packed, indoor receptions.” No masks, no distancing and time spent among crowds indoors are a recipe for transmission.

All of this underscores the central flaw in the White House’s approach: Testing alone

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Planaria flatworms can be alternative screening tool to avoid rabbit skin testing — ScienceDaily

Tests for skin treatments could be screened using flatworms rather than other animals such as rabbits, according to new research.

A team at the University of Reading and Newcastle University have found that planaria, a type of flatworm, can be used as a reliable alternative for testing topical skin products used to treat human tissues such as the eyes, nose or vagina to ensure that they are not harmful.

The paper, published in Toxicology in Vitro, shows how the use of a fluorescent dye mixed with a potential skin product is absorbed through the outer layers of skin in the planaria.

The tests are cheaper and more ethical than existing animal tests, because planaria are readily available and easily cultured in a laboratory — and don’t experience suffering. While other tests are carried out on human skin cells in a petri dish, the new screening method would provide a

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