SpaceX scrubs Starlink satellite launch Thursday due to ground sensor reading

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A Falcon 9 blasts off on Aug. 30.


SpaceX

The Falcon 9 rocket booster that sent NASA astronauts to the International Space Station in May is set to get recycled again when SpaceX sends 60 more Starlink satellites to orbit atop its column of fire, but it didn’t happen Thursday as planned. 

The launch, originally scheduled for September, has been postponed multiple times due to weather, including on Monday morning when heavy clouds above Florida’s Cape Canaveral prevented launch at the last second. On Thursday, another launch was scrubbed 18 seconds before blastoff due to an aberrant ground sensor reading. A new target launch date has not yet been announced. 

“All in a day’s work for the launch team. They’ll investigate, diagnose probable cause, fix the problem, and get us ready for the next launch

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PM Update: Breezes wane into a cool overnight, and clouds increase Thursday

Through tonight: Breezy conditions will persist through sunset, but winds are slowly diminishing. They will calm more substantially later on. The cool and clear conditions of this evening will stick around much of the night. We should see winds die off with the sunset, which will help temperatures falling to the 50s feel generally comfortable. Lows will range from near 50 to the upper 50s.

Tomorrow (Thursday): It will be another good-looking day. Sunshine will be plentiful through midday before clouds build during the afternoon. Any rain chances should hold off until after dark. Highs will be in the low and mid-70s. Winds will be from the southwest, around 5 to 10 mph.

Pollen update: Mold spores are high. Tree, grass and weed pollen is low.

Rain: Precipitation totals were mostly on the light side of the forecast around here last night. As suggested by some of the high-resolution models

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A newly discovered asteroid will pass close to Earth on Thursday

Discovered only on September 18, in Tucson, Arizona, the school bus-sized asteroid which is estimated to be somewhere between 15-30 feet in diameter is expected to graze past our planets surface with about 13,000 miles of breathing room. This falls well below the orbit of our geostationary weather satellites which are located about 22,000 miles above earth’s surface.

Its closest approach to earth will occur around 7:12 a.m. ET on Thursday, as it skirts over the Southeastern Pacific Ocean, near Australia and New Zealand.

Its approach will be so close to earth, that our gravity will alter its speed and trajectory according to earthsky.org.

“There are a large number of tiny asteroids like this one, and several of them approach our planet as close as this several times every year,” said Paul Chodas, director of the Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.… Read More

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