Justice Department opposes TikTok’s request for injunction in new filing

The Justice Department filed its opposition Friday to TikTok’s request for an injunction against the Trump administration’s looming ban of the app, and the agency pulled no punches. The DOJ says blocking the the ban would “infringe on the President’s authority to block business-to-business economic transactions with a foreign entity in the midst of a declared national-security emergency.”



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The DOJ also alleges that the CEO of TikTok’s parent company ByteDance, Zhang Yiming, is a “mouthpiece” for the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), and is “committed to promoting the CCP’s agenda and messaging.”

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Large chunks of the DOJ filing are redacted

Large chunks of the DOJ filing are redacted, including a section detailing where the DOJ claims TikTok stores US users’ data. The part that’s visible claims “US user data being stored outside of the United States presents significant risks in this

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ByteDance just asked China for permission to export TikTok’s technology as it tries to finalize a deal with the US government



Xi Jinping wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump attends a bilateral meeting with China's President Xi Jinping during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters


© Kevin Lamarque/Reuters
President Donald Trump attends a bilateral meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

TikTok’s parent company ByteDance has sought permission from the Chinese government to export technology, Bloomberg reported Wednesday.

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ByteDance filed a request with the Beijing Municipal Commerce Bureau asking for approval to export its technology under restrictions recently implemented by the Chinese government, according to Bloomberg.

ByteDance, TikTok, and the Commerce Bureau did not respond to requests for comment.

In August, China expanded its list of “forbidden and restricted technology exports” to include “personalized information recommendation services based on data analysis” — such as the algorithm that powers TikTok. That move threw a wrench in the TikTok deal by requiring the company to obtain a license from the government, effectively giving Beijing veto power over a deal.

Following the announcement of

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