Apple Wins Patent for Ultrasonic Wave Technology that accepts Touch Commands Under Water

 

Today Apple was granted a patent titled “Ultrasonic touch detection through display” Apple’s granted patent relates to system architectures, apparatus and methods for acoustic touch detection and exemplary applications of the system architectures, apparatus and methods. The technology will allow touch commands on an iDevice under water and more. 

 

 Apple notes in their patent filing that the position of an object touching a surface can be determined using time of flight (TOF) bounding box techniques, acoustic image reconstruction techniques, acoustic tomography techniques, attenuation of reflections from an array of barriers, or a two-dimensional piezoelectric receiving array, for example.

 

Acoustic touch sensing can utilize transducers, such as piezoelectric transducers, to transmit ultrasonic waves along a surface and/or through the thickness of an electronic device to the surface.

 

As the ultrasonic wave propagates, one or more objects (e.g., fingers, styli – Apple Pencil) in contact with the surface can interact with the

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Sense of touch for VR is arriving now, with attached hype

The news about VR touch is becoming a torrent of verbosity. We’re now talking about full body haptics, stable haptics, room-scale haptics and “much more”.

So what is this really all about, you ask sweetly from your bunker? Essentially it’s transferring an equivalent sense of touch to a VR object, at this point. This is another sensory interface, much like creating media for sight and sound.

The inevitable first frontier for haptic tech is of course gaming. The commercial buzz is unmistakeable and getting louder. This is big, and getting bigger on a daily basis. Haptics in some form are even coming to PlayStation controllers. Predictably enough, the theme is immersion, as though gamers weren’t immersed by definition.

(It’ll be interesting to see if lazy game developers and marketers do anything about making haptic games more reliable and less infuriating than current games. Crashes, no-saves, etc. are the usual fodder

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‘Universal law of touch’ will enable new advances in virtual reality — ScienceDaily

Seismic waves, commonly associated with earthquakes, have been used by scientists to develop a universal scaling law for the sense of touch. A team, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, used Rayleigh waves to create the first scaling law for touch sensitivity. The results are published in Science Advances.

The researchers are part of a European consortium (H-Reality) that are already using the theory to develop new Virtual Reality technologies that incorporate the sense of touch.

Rayleigh waves are created by impact between objects and are commonly thought to travel only along surfaces. The team discovered that, when it comes to touch, the waves also travel through layers of skin and bone and are picked up by the body’s touch receptor cells.

Using mathematical modelling of these touch receptors the researchers showed how the receptors were located at depths that allowed them to respond to Rayleigh waves.

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The science behind our sense of touch

European researchers have developed a new universal scaling law for the sense of touch, and it’s paving the way for an expansion of virtual reality technology.

“Touch is a primordial sense, as important to our ancient ancestors as it is to modern-day mammals, but it’s also one of the most complex and therefore least understood,” says lead researcher Tom Montenegro-Johnson from the University of Birmingham, UK.

“While we have universal laws to explain sight and hearing, for example, this is the first time that we’ve been able to explain touch in this way.” 

When a person slides a finger across a surface, vibrations travel through their skin and excite nerve endings. These convert the mechanical vibrations to electrical signals and transmit them to the brain, where they are interpreted as a tactile experience. This signal allows humans to differentiate between textures, detect contact, and manipulate objects.

“However, the properties of

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‘Universal law of touch’ will enable new advances in virtual reality

touch
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Seismic waves, commonly associated with earthquakes, have been used by scientists to develop a universal scaling law for the sense of touch. A team, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, used Rayleigh waves to create the first scaling law for touch sensitivity. The results are published in Science Advances.


The researchers are part of a European consortium (H-Reality) that are already using the theory to develop new Virtual Reality technologies that incorporate the sense of touch.

Rayleigh waves are created by impact between objects and are commonly thought to travel only along surfaces. The team discovered that, when it comes to touch, the waves also travel through layers of skin and bone and are picked up by the body’s touch receptor cells.

Using mathematical modelling of these touch receptors the researchers showed how the receptors were located at depths that allowed them to

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Touch Controller IC Market | Adoption of New Technologies to Boost the Market Growth

The global touch controller IC market size is poised to grow by USD 6.67 billion during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of over 15% throughout the forecast period, according to the latest report by Technavio. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The report also provides the market impact and new opportunities created due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Download a Free Sample of REPORT with COVID-19 Crisis and Recovery Analysis.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005438/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Touch Controller IC Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

The consumer inclination toward new technologies and devices will be a significant factor in driving the growth of the touch controller IC market. The incorporation of features such as unlimited touch, single and multi-touch, automotive touch, flexibility, passive

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Will iPhone 12 have Touch ID so we can unlock our phones with masks on? Probably not

Apple’s new iPad Air integrates Touch ID into a button on the side of the iPad.


Apple

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

One of the best new Apple features introduced during our unusual times may not appear in the iPhone 12. It may not arrive on any iPhone until next year — if at all. Apple’s new iPad Air, unveiled in mid-September and hitting the market later this month, relocates Touch ID to a button on the edge of the device. The company’s upcoming iPhone 12 lineup should do something similar, giving users an option between unlocking their iPhone using their face or unlocking it with their fingerprint as the world combats the coronavirus pandemic

Apple’s updated $599 (£579, AU$899) iPad Air integrates Touch ID into the power button on top of the tablet.

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Power button Touch ID on the iPad Air 4 was an ‘incredible feat’

A pair of Apple executives have discussed changes to the iPad introduced in the iPad Air 4, including the “incredible feat of engineering” to add a Touch ID sensor to the power button on the new model.

Apple revealed its iPad Air 4 on September 15, complete with an updated A14 Bionic chip, a design inspired by the iPad Pro line, and a larger 10.9-inch display. Arguably the biggest departure for the iPad Air is its biometric alterations, with Touch ID moved from the now-gone Home button to the power button on the top.

Speaking on the iJustine and Jenna Ezarik podcast Same Brain published on Saturday, Apple VP of hardware engineering John Ternus and Apple VP of product marketing Bob Borchers talked about the changes that the iPad lineup underwent during the September event.

On the subject of Touch ID on the tablet, Borchers described the

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iPhone 12 should have Touch ID like the iPad Air — but it probably won’t

Apple’s new iPad Air integrates Touch ID into a button on the side of the iPad.


Apple

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

One of the best new Apple features introduced during our unusual times may not appear in the iPhone 12. It may not arrive on any iPhone until next year — if at all. Apple’s new iPad Air, unveiled in mid-September and hitting the market later this month, relocates Touch ID to a button on the edge of the device. The company’s upcoming iPhone 12 lineup should do something similar, giving users an option between unlocking their iPhone using their face or unlocking it with their fingerprint as the world combats the coronavirus pandemic

Apple’s updated $599 (£579, AU$899) iPad Air integrates Touch ID into the power button on top of the tablet.

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iPad Air: How Apple’s new Touch ID fingerprint sensor will work

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The new iPad Air comes in four new colors. 


Apple

In September, Apple announced a completely redesigned iPad Air. The new look borrows the same overall design as the iPad Pro, with flat edges, no home button and a USB-C port. But one thing it doesn’t carry over is Apple’s facial recognition tech, Face ID. Instead, you’ll use a fingerprint to unlock the tablet, approve purchases and sign into apps. 

For the first time on a mobile device, we’re seeing Apple’s new Touch ID sensor hidden under the power button. Or, as Apple calls it, the “top button.” When holding the iPad Air vertically, you’ll find the button on the top-right edge, near the corner. When it’s connected to an accessory like Apple’s Magic keyboard, it’ll be on the left-hand side, near the top. 

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