CBP expands facial recognition program to international travelers at San Francisco and San Jose airports

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) this week announced the expansion of its Simplified Arrival program, which uses facial recognition to verify the identity of airline travelers arriving in the U.S. According to a press release, Simplified Arrival is now in use at San Francisco International Airport and Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport following recent installations in Detroit and Houston.

As early as 2016, CBP began laying the groundwork for the program of which Simplified Arrival is a part: the $1 billion Biometric Entry-Exit Program. Through partnerships with airlines like Delta and JetBlue, CBP has access to manifests that it uses to build facial recognition databases incorporating photos from entry inspections, U.S. visas, and other U.S. Department of Homeland Security corpora. Camera kiosks at airports capture live photos and compare them with photos in the database, attempting to identify matches. When there’s no existing photo available for matching,

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Face Shields Won’t Protect Travelers From Covid-19

For months, people have been choosing between wearing masks or face shields when working with the public and for when they are traveling or working in public places.

New research, however, conducted by a Japanese supercomputer concludes that face shields are ineffective in trapping respiratory aerosols, as reported by The Guardian.

The world’s fastest supercomputer is called Fugaku and it discovered that 100% of airborne droplets of less than 5 micrometres escaped through plastic visors, like the ones used by people who work in service industries. (A micrometre is one millionth of a metre).

Of larger droplets which measure 50 micrometres, about half were able to escape into the surrounding air–a fact confirmed by a government-backed research institute in Kobe, Japan called Riken.

The supercomputer, which cost 130 billion yen (or $1.2 billion) has

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