Windows 10: Microsoft fires shot at Apple with new principles for treating developers right

Microsoft’s latest move in its war on Apple’s App Store rules is a list of 10 principles outlining what the Redmond company will and won’t do to developers who publish apps for Windows 10 and distribute them on the Microsoft Store. 

Microsoft says it will not block competing app stores on Windows and will not block apps because of a developer’s business model, such as whether an app’s content is installed on a device or streamed from the cloud. 

Microsoft published the 10 principles a day after Congress released a damning report into anticompetitive practices at Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. The EU opened its investigation into Apple’s App Store rules this June.  

SEE: Top 10 iPad tips (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

“Apple’s monopoly power over software distribution to iOS devices has resulted in harms to competitors and competition, reducing quality and innovation among app developers, and increasing prices and reducing

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Finding a better route to treating social anxiety disorder may lie in another part of the brain, researchers suggest — ScienceDaily

Studies have long suggested that oxytocin — a hormone that can also act as a neurotransmitter — regulates prosocial behavior such as empathy, trust and bonding, which led to its popular labeling as the “love hormone.” Mysteriously, oxytocin has also been shown to play a role in antisocial behaviors and emotions, including reduced cooperation, envy and anxiety. How oxytocin could exert such opposite roles had largely remained a mystery, but a new UC Davis study sheds light on how this may work.

Working with California mice, UC Davis researches showed that the “love hormone” oxytocin can sometimes have antisocial effects depending on where in the brain it is made. (Mark Chappell/UC Riverside)

While most oxytocin is produced in an area of the brain known as the hypothalamus, some oxytocin is produced in another brain area known as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, or BNST. The BNST is known

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ECMO outcomes study at experienced centers suggests key role for treating worst-hit patients as pandemic continues — ScienceDaily

It saved lives in past epidemics of lung-damaging viruses. Now, the life-support option known as ECMO appears to be doing the same for many of the critically ill COVID-19 patients who receive it, according to a new international study.

The 1,035 patients in the study faced a staggeringly high risk of death, as ventilators and other care failed to support their lungs. But after they were placed on ECMO, their actual death rate was less than 40%. That’s similar to the rate for patients treated with ECMO in past outbreaks of lung-damaging viruses, and other severe forms of viral pneumonia.

The new study published in The Lancet provides strong support for the use of ECMO — short for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation — in appropriate patients as the pandemic rages on worldwide.

It may help more hospitals that have ECMO capability understand which of their COVID-19 patients might benefit from the

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