Take the ultimate road trip with Ed Ruscha

Danny Kwan, left, Ed Ruscha and Bryan Heath in Ruscha's Datsun pickup truck in a 1975 image from the artist's "Streets of Los Angeles" archive. <span class="copyright">(Ed Ruscha / Getty Research Institute)</span>
Danny Kwan, left, Ed Ruscha and Bryan Heath in Ruscha’s Datsun pickup truck in a 1975 image from the artist’s “Streets of Los Angeles” archive. (Ed Ruscha / Getty Research Institute)

Ed Ruscha invites you on the ultimate road trip: Time travel with him, over 42 years, along the full length of Sunset Boulevard from downtown L.A. to the beach.

Step inside the artist’s 1965 magenta pickup truck, with its blue Naugahyde interior and wimpy-sounding horn. Roll down the windows and let the breeze in, as the vehicle whizzes past the legendary Viper Room, called Filthy McNasty’s in the 1970s. To the left, oh, there’s the Cinerama Dome, showing “The Day of the Jackal” in 1973 and “Back to the Future” in 1985; to the right, a Brentwood hillside minus the Getty Center in 1990. End up at Gladstones by the beach for seafood and cocktails in 2007 because, well,

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Spacebit books a second trip to the Moon via NASA’s commercial lunar payload program

UK-based robotic rover startup Spacebit has booked a second payload delivery to the Moon, aboard the Nova-C lander that Intuitive Machines is planning to send in 2021 as part of NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) program. Spacebit already has a berth aboard the Astrobotic Peregrine lander that’s set to go to the Moon in July 2021, flying atop a Vulcan Centaur rocket, and so this would follow quickly on the heels of that mission, with a current mission timeframe of October 2021 to deliver the Intuitive Machines lander via a SpaceX Falcon 9.

Spacebit’s Asagumo 4-legged walking rover is set to fly on that first CLPS mission (which NASA created to source commercial partners for delivering experiments and payloads to the Moon along with over private cargo ahead of its Artemis crewed Moon missions). For this second Nova-C lander launch, Spacebit is preparing a wheeled rover that will carry

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Make Your Next Pumpkin Patch Visit A Math And Science Field Trip

ACROSS AMERICA — There’s a contest for everything, and pumpkins are no exception. You may be rightfully proud of that enormous pumpkin in your patch, but unless it weighs upward of 2,500 pounds, you’re not flirting with any kind of record.

Turning this year’s pumpkin patch visit on its end — and let’s face it, everything about 2020 is upended — why not give the kids in your coronavirus pandemic classroom a field trip?

Oodles of STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — lessons are possible while trudging around the hills of pumpkins.

Teach them a little about pi — not pumpkin pie, but the mathematical formula to calculate the circumference of a circle — or how to convert pounds to kilograms.

The largest pumpkin ever recorded in the United States was grown by Steve Geddes. The pumpkin that the Boscawen, New Hampshire, man grew in 2018 tipped the

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