Spark Turns On 5G In Auckland And Offers A Glimpse Into The Future Of Smart Cities

Spark turned on 5G in downtown Auckland today and has
partnered with Auckland Transport (AT) to showcase some of
the latest in IoT (Internet of Things) technology and
demonstrate what the future could look like for Auckland’s
CBD with the power of 5G.

5G is expected to underpin
the widespread deployment of IoT technology with its
increased speeds, low latency (or lag) and reliability. To
bring this potential to life, Spark and AT have installed
IoT enabled infrastructure at Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter –
including 5G connected lighting, smart benches with charging
capability, smart bins, and parking sensors.

Spark
Technology Lead, Renee Mateparae said: “We are excited to
launch our commercial 5G network in downtown Auckland today,
building on the private network we have in place to support
Emirates Team New Zealand and the launch of Spark Race Zone
last month. Our

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UJ’s computer science and software engineering academy turns 50

Professor Basie von Solms, co-founder of the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering.

Professor Basie von Solms, co-founder of the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering.

One of SA’s first independent computer science schools, the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering (ACSSE) in the Faculty of Science at the University of Johannesburg (UJ), is celebrating 50 years.

Co-founded in 1970 by professors Sebastiaan “Basie” von Solms and Andries van der Walt, ACSSE has since attained global status for its programmes.

Van der Walt and Von Solms were the first two staff members of the academy and the latter was head of computer science for 27 years.

The academy has a strong international research record, and is currently concentrating on areas related to the fourth industrial revolution.

ACSSE is also now heavily involved in research, focusing on cyber security, cyber counter-intelligence, artificial intelligence, intelligent software agents, Web services and biometric applications.

Von Solms says the department has made significant progress in

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As Instagram turns 10, influence still growing

The photo and video sharing app has more than 1 billion users.

This week marks 10 years since the founding of Instagram, the hugely popular social media app that boasts more than a billion users.

Sarah Frier is the author of “No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram.” She says Instagram’s growth over the last decade, especially after it was acquired by Facebook for $1 billion in 2012, is widespread and easy to see.

“It’s a platform where you can look around you and see the impact of the app, in a way that you can’t as easily see the impact of a Facebook or a Twitter,” Frier said.

One of the most prominent Instagram features is its photo-editing tools: namely, its selection of colorful filters. Frier says the customization that Instagram affords its users has produced millions of eye-catching photos.

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NASA turns to 3D-printed construction for outer space infrastructure

Taking its name from the mythological home of the gods, an Austin, Texas startup firm is focusing its unique methods of housebuilding in a team-up with NASA for an expansive space-based construction system that will deliver a wide array of landing pads, storage facilities, fuel depots, access roads, laboratories, and living habitats for missions to the Moon and Mars.

ICON is mostly known for its proficiency at creating 3D-printed houses on Earth and will now extend their expertise in this arena with the launch of Project Olympus, an ambitious effort to develop needed infrastructure as humanity ventures forth from the planet and begins to establish permanent bases and sustained scientific programs off-world.

“Building humanity’s first home on another world will be the most ambitious construction project in human history and will push science, engineering, technology, and architecture to literal new heights,” said Jason Ballard, co-founder and CEO of ICON. “NASA’s

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‘Digital chemistry’ breakthrough turns words into molecules

chemistry
Credit: OpenClipartVectors, CC0 Public Domain

A new system capable of automatically turning words into molecules on demand will open up the digitisation of chemistry, scientists say.


Researchers from the University of Glasgow’s School of Chemistry, who developed the system, claim it will lead to the creation of a “Spotify for chemistry”—a vast online repository of downloadable recipes for important molecules including drugs.

The creation of such a system could help developing countries more easily access medications, enable more efficient international scientific collaboration, and even support the human exploration of space.

The Glasgow team, led by Professor Lee Cronin, have laid the groundwork for digital chemistry with the development of what they call a “chemical processing unit”—an affordable desktop-sized robot chemist which is capable of doing the repetitive and time-consuming work of creating chemicals. Other robot chemists, built with different operating systems, have also been developed elsewhere.

Up until now, those

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DOJ proposes congressional fix of Section 230 as Trump turns up heat on Big Tech

trump-twittergettyimages-1227631606

President Donald Trump signs an executive order to regulate social media, which could lead to attempts to punish companies, such as Twitter and Google, for attempting to point out factual inconsistencies in social media posts by politicians. 


Doug Mills/Getty Images

The Department of Justice proposed legislation Wednesday that would weaken legal liability protections for social media companies, like Facebook and Twitter, and hold them accountable for how they moderate content on their platforms. The news comes as the Trump administration turns up the heat on big tech companies as the 2020 US presidential race gets into full swing. 

Specifically, the new law if passed by Congress and signed by the president, would alter the criteria online platforms must meet to benefit from liability protections granted by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. 

“For too long Section 230 has provided a shield for online platforms to operate with impunity,” Attorney

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