Into the Mother Lands interview: Twitch invests in an RPG show led by people of color

Critical Role has played an important roll in the rise of actual play RPG livestreams and podcasts, turning these from a niche to a major player in the streaming ecosystem. According to measurement firm StreamElements, viewers watched an aggregated 19.5 million hours of such shows on Twitch an YouTube, a 1,142% increase over 2018. 2020’s numbers are likely higher.

And one of the best of these actual play shows is Rivals of Waterdeep, a Wizards of the Coast-backed project. It started in 2018 in conjunction with Dungeons & DragonsWaterdeep: Dragon Heist storyline. It’s now in its 8th season, and the project features some of what I consider the deepest role-playing you can find in any D&D show.

Tanya DePass is one of the Rivals‘ players. And she’s teaming up with B. Dave Walters, whose credits include the transmedia Electropunk project, A Darkened Wish (an actual play

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Twitch Picked Up Most Of Mixer’s Streamers, Report Shows

KEY POINTS

  • Twitch’s share of hours broadcast on major live-streaming platforms saw the biggest increase after Mixer’s shutdown
  • This is despite Mixer’s attempt to funnel its streamers to Facebook Gaming
  • Twitch saw a decrease in viewership in the last quarter while YouTube and Facebook Gaming grew

Despite Microsoft’s efforts to push Mixers streamers to Facebook Gaming, it appears most of them went to Twitch instead, according to a new report.

Before Microsoft shut down Mixer in July, the company tried to direct its streamers and audience toward Facebook Gaming rather than the leading streaming platform. However, a report from Streamlabs & Stream Hatchet indicates that Twitch has become the ultimate beneficiary of Mixer’s closure. 

Twitch’s share of hours broadcast on major live-streaming platforms jumped by over 14.5% in the last quarter. This is nearly identical to the 14.2% market share that Mixer held at one point. The report stated that

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Streaming report: Twitch inherits Mixer’s streamers, now has 91% of all content produced

Microsoft abruptly shutting down Mixer back in June has ended up as a boon for Amazon’s Twitch platform.

That’s according to a new report from Stream Hatchet and Streamlabs, which found that Twitch is now the host for more than 91% of streaming content. At the same time, while the overall audience for livestreaming has shrunk slightly from its all-time high back in April, Twitch’s popularity has nonetheless exploded during the pandemic, with nearly double the audience that it had at this time last year.

Independent data analyses in the streaming market focus on tracking hours watched to indicate a platform’s popularity with its audience. Relatively few take hours streamed — the amount of content being produced for that audience — into account. What makes the Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet report interesting is that it does track the latter, and it makes it look a lot like most of the ex-Mixer streamers

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Microsoft’s Mixer Streamers Flock to Twitch Instead of Facebook

(Bloomberg) — When Microsoft Corp. shut down Mixer in July, the company encouraged the livestreaming service’s stars to move to Facebook Inc. Instead, the majority have migrated to Amazon.com Inc.’s Twitch, including Tyler Blevins, the gamer known as Ninja.

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Twitch’s market share of hours streamed jumped to 91% in the third quarter, up 15% from the second quarter, according to a report from streaming-software provider Streamlabs, which used data from Stream Hatchet. Before its shutdown, Mixer held a 14% share of livestreaming content.

Meanwhile, Facebook Gaming’s market share for hours streamed increased by only 1%, and YouTube Gaming’s actually fell by 1.2% in the third quarter. In recent months, star players such as Shroud and FaZe Ewok moved back to Twitch. Blevins, who has 16 million followers on the site, returned to the service in September.

Streamers like Ninja were on Twitch for years before being lured to

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2 Million Creators Make 6-Figure Incomes On YouTube, Instagram, Twitch Globally

There are currently over 50 million creators on Youtube, Instagram, Twitch, TikTok, and other social media platforms. Two million of them are full-time, and they earn six figure salaries by creating content daily or weekly. And that massive distributed content creation engine means that about 90% of the video, audio, photo, and text-based content consumed today by Gen Z is created by individuals, not corporations.

That’s a massive cultural shift.

These are just a few of the insights from a recent report on the “creator economy” by Yuanling Yuan, senior associate at SignalFire, and investment firm.

“The number of those long tail amateur influencers/creators is going to explode. I think by our data, this should grow from 50 million to a 100 million and possibly even larger,” Yuan told me in

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Twitch Rolls Out Soundtrack Beta To Give Streamers Rights-Cleared Music

Licensed music has been an issue for many streamers in the past, with takedown notices coming from rights holders and making certain games complicated to stream or post videos of. It’s made streaming games with big licensed soundtracks, like Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2, difficult. Twitch is testing a solution to this issue, an app called Soundtrack By Twitch that will allow streamers to play license-cleared music in their streams.

In a blog post, Twitch has detailed Soundtrack, which has an interface very similar to Spotify. “Soundtrack gives you a curated collection of rights-cleared music and integrates with your streaming software to separate your audio sources, allowing you to keep your channel safe while you create compelling content and grow as a creator,” the post says.

Artists currently available, according to the blog, include Above & Beyond, mxmtoon, Porter Robinson, RAC, SwuM, “and many more”. Claude Von Stroke, Cloudchord, Chrome

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Amazon debuts Luna cloud gaming service, Twitch connect, Ubisoft games

  • Amazon announced Luna, a free video game streaming service that lets you play hit games on your phone, computer, and other streaming devices, on Thursday. 
  • Gamers can purchase their own games on Luna, or subscribe to different “game channels” for an ongoing collection.
  • For $5.99 per month, players can subscribe to the Luna+ channel, which will grant them access to dozens of games, including hit titles like “Control,” and “Resident Evil 7.” 
  • Amazon has also designed a special Wi-Fi enabled Luna controller that will help reduce delay when streaming, compared to a standard Bluetooth controller. It will be available for $50 during the early access period.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

Amazon is expanding its push into video games.

On Thursday, the company launched Luna, a free cloud-gaming service designed to deliver video games to your computer, phone, and other streaming devices. Luna will work on PC, Mac,

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