Facebook, Google, Twitter CEOs to testify at Oct. 28 Senate hearing

Marcy Gordon, Associated Press
Published 8:01 p.m. ET Oct. 5, 2020 | Updated 8:03 p.m. ET Oct. 5, 2020

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Four Big Tech CEOs – Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Sundar Pichai of Google and Tim Cook of Apple – are testifying on their companies’ practices on the issue of market dominance in the industry. (July 29)

AP Domestic

The CEOs of technology giants Facebook, Google and Twitter are expected to testify for an Oct. 28 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

The Senate Commerce Committee voted last week to authorize subpoenas for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai of Google and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey to force them to testify if they didn’t agree to do so voluntarily. Spokespeople for the companies said Monday that the CEOs will cooperate.

The hearing “must be constructive and focused on what matters most to

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SEC sues John McAfee over promoting cryptocurrency offerings on Twitter

John McAfee

Paula Bustamante | AFP | Getty Images

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday sued John McAfee, creator of the eponymous anti-virus software, alleging that he made over $23.1 million in undisclosed compensation from recommending seven cryptocurrency offerings on Twitter that were materially false and misleading.

The regulator, which is seeking a trial by jury, alleged that from at least November 2017 through February 2018, McAfee recommended cryptocurrencies that he was paid to promote, while falsely denying “he was being paid by the issuers.”

“McAfee leveraged his fame to make more than $23.1 million in undisclosed compensation” by recommending at least seven initial coin offerings or ICOs to his Twitter followers, the SEC said.

McAfee’s recommendations were “materially false and misleading,” in that he tried to sell “virtually worthless” cryptocurrency tokens by encouraging investors to buy the securities without disclosing his own holdings, the SEC alleged.

The

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This climate activist says he was silenced on Twitter

A Ugandan environmental activist was suspended from Twitter in the midst of a high-profile campaign — a suspension he believes is connected to his opponents in the country’s government and industries linked to deforestation. Twitter won’t say what caused the account to be frozen, but environmental groups worry it’s part of a broader trend of powerful stakeholders exploiting Twitter’s moderation system to silence climate activists.

The suspension happened on the night of September 12th, after 22-year-old Nyombi Morris had just finished a television appearance about the preservation of the Bugoma Forest. The morning after the interview, he woke up to find his account was frozen without explanation. He says he contacted Twitter’s Help Center at least five times during the weeks his account was suspended but couldn’t figure out what had triggered the freeze, and began to suspect the suspension could be connected to his advocacy. Another Ugandan activist with

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Twitter bans Trump death wishes, sparks debate

Twitter is removing tweets hoping for the demise of US President Donald Trump — a move which opened up the social platform to criticism that it should enforce the same policy for everyone.

San Francisco-based Twitter drew a line on caustic commentary after Trump’s Covid-19 hospitalization Friday, telling users that expressing hope for the death of anyone violates policies against abusive behavior at the one-to-many messaging service.

“Tweets that wish or hope for death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease against anyone are not allowed and will need to be removed,” Twitter said in a post.

Attached was a link to a Twitter policy page that said it does not tolerate content that wishes, hopes, or expresses desire for someone to die or contract a fatal disease.

The post sparked a firestorm of responses from people contending that Twitter has not been consistent about enforcing those rules.

“So… you mean

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Praises Bitcoin, Calls It ‘Future’ Of Company Security

By Landon Manning

Twitter co-founder and CEO and longtime Bitcoin advocate Jack Dorsey has added to his praise of the cryptocurrency and its underlying blockchain, saying it is the future of security and other protocols on the social media platform in wake of recent hacks.

Dorsey has been a persistent advocate for the possibilities of Bitcoin for quite a while now, saying it was 10 years away from being the world’s single currency in 2018 and calling it the “best” of all available cryptocurrencies earlier in September 2020. And, later that same month, Dorsey made more specific and motivated predictions about some parts of Bitcoin’s future, particularly those parts he can take advantage of at Twitter.

The key to understanding Dorsey’s new statements on Bitcoin is to see how the advantages of a decentralized, trustless, secure platform that anyone can contribute to unfolded in a way very close to him.

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The Proud Boys Are Furious That Gay Men Have Taken Over #ProudBoys On Twitter

Two very different groups of men are at war on the internet today: the far-right group known as the Proud Boys—and the thousands of gay Twitter users who flooded that platform with pro-LGBT images, marking those posts with #proudboys. 

The hashtag trended in North America throughout Sunday with gay Twitter users sharing images of themselves, their spouses and other gay people. Several celebrities added their voices to the

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Wishing Trump’s death from COVID-19 not allowed on Facebook, Twitter

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President Trump’s Twitter page.


Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

As news of President Donald Trump’s positive COVID-19 diagnosis spread, social media companies warned their users that content wishing for the president to die won’t be allowed on their platforms.

After the president revealed on Thursday that he and first lad Melania Trump had tested positive for the virus, many people took to social media to wish him a speedy recovery, but many others said they hoped for the opposite outcome.

A Facebook spokesperson Friday such post violate the social media giant’s user policies and will be removed.

“To be clear, Facebook is removing death threats or content targeted directly at the president that wishes him death, including comments on his posts or his page – in addition

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Twitter, Facebook, and Google CEOs to testify on Oct. 28 to Congress

 Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, arrives for a hearing on May 6 in Washington, D.C.

Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, arrives for a hearing on May 6 in Washington, D.C.

Less than a week before the 2020 presidential election, three of the biggest names in tech—Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey—will testify before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation about a longstanding law that protects websites from liability for user-generated content.

The committee unanimously voted to subpoena the men on Thursday. They’re scheduled to testify on Oct. 28, according to committee aides who spoke with Politico on Friday on the condition of anonymity. While the subpoenas are ready to go out, they will not be formally issued because the CEOs have voluntarily agreed to appear before the committee, one aide told the outlet.

Their testimony will address Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a

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Facebook, Twitter, Google CEOs will testify before U.S. Senate committee

By David Shepardson and Nandita Bose

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The chief executives of Facebook <FB.O, Twitter <TWTR.N> and Alphabet-owned Google <GOOGL.O> have agreed to voluntarily testify at a hearing before the Senate Commerce Committee on Oct. 28 about a key law protecting internet companies.

Facebook and Twitter confirmed on Friday that their CEOs, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey, respectively, will appear, while a source said that Google’s Sundar Pichai will appear. That came a day after the committee unanimously voted to approve a plan to subpoena the three CEOs to appear before the panel.

Twitter’s Dorsey tweeted on Friday that the hearing “must be constructive & focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections.”

The CEOs are to appear virtually.

In addition to discussions on reforming the law called Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects internet companies from liability

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Twitter, Facebook to Send CEOs to Senate Hearing on Section 230

Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

(Bloomberg) — Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. will send their chief executive officers to a U.S. Senate hearing later this month devoted to a law that shields internet companies from liabilities.

A Senate panel voted to subpoena the heads of Twitter, Facebook and Alphabet Inc.’s Google for an Oct. 28 session focusing on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a provision that protects the companies from lawsuits over user-generated content. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg have agreed to attend voluntarily, their companies said.

The hearing “must be constructive & focused on what

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