On old film, a collector in Georgia uncovered a glimpse into Hawaii’s past from 1976

HONOLULU, Hawaii (HawaiiNewsNow) – A collector in Georgia recently purchased an old camera from an online auction, and it turned out to be more valuable than she expected.



a sign posing for the camera: The photos were taken in Hawaii in 1976 at a political rally at McKinley High School for John Craven who was running for Congress for the first time.


© Provided by Honolulu KHNL
The photos were taken in Hawaii in 1976 at a political rally at McKinley High School for John Craven who was running for Congress for the first time.

“Honestly, I wasn’t even looking to buy the camera, I was actually looking to buy the film,” said Atlanta camera collector Jodi Benaroch. “This kind of film has been discontinued many, many years ago, but I do have one or two other cameras that use it.”

Benaroch says she bought the old film and Kodak Instamatic camera from an eBay seller in Hawaii for about $60.

She says she noticed the number “8” on the back of the device, which meant there were someones’ photos inside.

“It will

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6,500-year-old copper workshop uncovered in the Negev Desert’s Beer Sheva

6,500-year-old copper workshop uncovered in the Negev Desert's Beer Sheva
Work on the dig in Beer Sheva. Credit: Anat Rasiuk, Israel Antiquities Authority

A new study by Tel Aviv University and the Israel Antiquities Authority indicates that a workshop for smelting copper ore once operated in the Neveh Noy neighborhood of Beer Sheva, the capital of the Negev Desert. The study, conducted over several years, began in 2017 in Beer Sheva when the workshop was first uncovered during an Israel Antiquities Authority emergency archeological excavation to safeguard threatened antiquities.


The new study also shows that the site may have made the first use in the world of a revolutionary apparatus: the furnace.

The study was conducted by Prof. Erez Ben-Yosef, Dana Ackerfeld, and Omri Yagel of the Jacob M. Alkow Department of Archeology and Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations at Tel Aviv University, in conjunction with Dr. Yael Abadi-Reiss, Talia Abulafia, and Dmitry Yegorov of the Israel Antiquities Authority and Dr.

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Damage uncovered on Antarctic glaciers reveals worrying signs for sea level rise

Damage uncovered on Antarctic glaciers reveals worrying signs for sea level rise
Crevasses observed on Pine Island Glacier. These open fractures are a sign of structural weakening. Credit NASA

A new study into the structural damage of two major Antarctic glaciers reveals that ice shelf weakening has rapidly evolved in recent years. Multi-satellite imagery identified damage areas, sparking concerns that structural weakening could lead to major ice shelf collapse in the decades to come. This collapse, in turn, reduces the glaciers’ ability to hold back major sections of the entire West Antarctic Ice Sheet from running into the ocean.


Pine Island Glacier and Thwaites Glacier are located in the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The fastest-changing outlet glaciers in the region, they account for Antarctica’s largest contribution to global sea level rise. Scientists have anticipated for at least 20 years that these glaciers will be the first to respond to climate change, Jessica O’Reilly, an environmental anthropologist at Indiana University, told GlacierHub.

If the

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Daunting marine predator’s fossil uncovered in Chile [Video]

Scientists in the vast Atacama desert in Chile have uncovered the remains of one of the largest and most daunting marine predators to patrol the Earth’s oceans — dating all the way back to some 160 million years ago.

The Atacama is the driest desert in the world, a moonscape of sand and stone.

But once, it was largely submerged beneath the Pacific Ocean.

According to researchers who found the fossils there, they once belonged to ancient reptiles called pliosaurs — predators with a more powerful bite than the Tyrannosaurus rex.

Paleontologist Rodrigo Otero led the research project.

“Pliosaurs were marine reptiles with heads similar to those of modern crocodiles with short and very robust necks, an aerodynamic body and athletically-adapted limbs. These reptiles could reach large sizes and some specimens have been found with over two-meter-long skulls.”

Otero says the find helps scientists fill gaps in time and evolution

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