Arctic researcher warns the ‘the ice is dying’ after landmark expedition

The icy landscape of the Arctic as we imagine it will no longer exist in just a few decades, researchers returning from a major expedition to the frozen north have warned.

“This world is threatened. We really saw how the ice is disappearing,” said Markus Rex, leader of the largest-ever Arctic expedition, at a press conference Monday.

Researchers involved in the expedition called MOSAiC — Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate — returned on the German vessel, the Polarstern, which spent more than a year at sea.

For much of the mission, the Polarstern was carried by the natural ice drift, pushed on by the wind, while researchers from 20 countries collected data about the environment and climate change. No other expedition to date has been able to collect similar evidence from the center of the Arctic, with the vessel spending weeks within 125 miles of the

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Brexit Britain Is Failing EU’s Data-Privacy Test, Activist Warns

(Bloomberg) — U.K. privacy protections were criticized by an activist who told the European Union that the British shouldn’t be trusted to protect user data after Brexit.



a close up of a cage: Light trails from network switches illuminate fiber optic cables, center, and copper Ethernet cables inside a communications room at an office in London, U.K., on Monday, May 21, 2018. The Department of Culture, Media and Sport will work with the Home Office to publish a white paper later this year setting out legislation, according to a statement, which will also seek to force tech giants to reveal how they target abusive and illegal online material posted by users.


© Bloomberg
Light trails from network switches illuminate fiber optic cables, center, and copper Ethernet cables inside a communications room at an office in London, U.K., on Monday, May 21, 2018. The Department of Culture, Media and Sport will work with the Home Office to publish a white paper later this year setting out legislation, according to a statement, which will also seek to force tech giants to reveal how they target abusive and illegal online material posted by users.

The personal data of EU citizens “do not at present have an adequate level of protection in the U.K.,” Johnny Ryan, a senior fellow at the Irish Council for Civil Liberties, wrote in a letter to the European Commission on Monday.

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Coronavirus updates: Birx warns of ‘troubling signs’ in Northeast amid ‘very different’ spread of COVID-19

“What we did in the spring is not going to work in the fall,” Birx said.

A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 1 million people worldwide.

Over 36.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The criteria for diagnosis — through clinical means or a lab test — has varied from country-to-country. Still, the actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

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TIO warns of hardship spike after NBN financial assistance winds up

More consumers are expected to experience hardship in paying their National Broadband Network (NBN) bills as Australia’s telcos look to eventually turn off the tap for financial support, a Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman (TIO) representative told a Senate committee on Friday.

Standing before the Joint Standing Committee on the National Broadband Network on Friday, TIO Judi Jones said the financial support given by government and industry had stalled any potential uptick of complaints that the agency expected from consumers.

“We’ve waited to see an increase in complaints about hardship and problems paying a bill — we think that will come, but by the end of the year it wasn’t showing up as a particular issue. It was starting to rise but it actually dropped off as an important issue in the pandemic because of financial support,” Jones said.

“We are anticipating, as government and providers wind back support measures, we’ll see

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EasyJet warns first ever annual loss could top $1 billion

By Sarah Young



a large passenger jet sitting on top of a tarmac: FILE PHOTO: EasyJet restarts its operations amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak at Gatwick Airport, in Gatwick


© Reuters/Peter Cziborra
FILE PHOTO: EasyJet restarts its operations amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak at Gatwick Airport, in Gatwick


LONDON (Reuters) – British airline easyJet warned on Thursday its first ever annual loss could be as much as 845 million pounds ($1.1 billion) as the pandemic meant it was flying just 25% of planned capacity.

The airline has signalled to the government it may need more financial support, according to media reports.

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The headline loss before tax forecast for the year ended Sept. 30 of 815-845 million pounds was worse than the loss of 794 million expected by analysts, Refinitiv Eikon data showed.

That is the first time easyJet, which was founded in 1995, has ever made a full-year loss.

With travel at very low levels, most European airlines are bleeding cash. EasyJet’s larger low-cost rival Ryanair has called this winter a “write-off”.

EasyJet

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PhosAgro Warns of Billions in Losses from EU Carbon Tax

(Bloomberg) — PhosAgro PJSC, Russia’s biggest producer of phosphate fertilizer, is calling for the government to help mitigate potentially billions in losses for the country’s raw-materials producers if Europe introduces a carbon tax.



a close up of a snow covered mountain: Granules of monoammonium phosphate (MAP) sit inside a storage warehouse at the PhosAgro-Cherepovets fertilizer plant, operated by PhosAgro PJSC, in Cherepovets, Russia, on Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017. Phosphate fertilizer prices may be supported in the 2H by "high season in India, pre-winter buying activity in the Northern hemisphere and risks of further potential production cuts in China," PhosAgro chief executive officer Andrey Guryev said in a statement.


© Bloomberg
Granules of monoammonium phosphate (MAP) sit inside a storage warehouse at the PhosAgro-Cherepovets fertilizer plant, operated by PhosAgro PJSC, in Cherepovets, Russia, on Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017. Phosphate fertilizer prices may be supported in the 2H by “high season in India, pre-winter buying activity in the Northern hemisphere and risks of further potential production cuts in China,” PhosAgro chief executive officer Andrey Guryev said in a statement.

The European Union is looking at how a potential carbon tax could help meet its 2050 goal of climate neutrality. If imposed, the levy would hit imports, including raw materials and products produced in countries without duties on emissions, such as Russia. The European Commission, the bloc’s executive

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Google initiative warns of Android security flaws in non-Pixel devices

Google already has efforts to improve Android security, such as speeding updates and offering bug bounties, but it’s now ramping things up by disclosing flaws for software it didn’t write. The company has launched an Android Partner Vulnerability Initiative (via XDA-Developers) to manage security flaws it discovers that are specific to third-party Android devices. Google hopes to both “drive remediation” (read: prompt faster patch releases) and warn users about potential problems.



a hand holding a cellphone: Huawei P30 and P30 Pro running Android


Huawei P30 and P30 Pro running Android

The company added that its initiative had already addressed a number of Android issues. It didn’t mention companies by name in a blog post, but a bug tracker for the program mentioned several manufacturers. Huawei had issues with insecure device backups in 2019, for example. Oppo and Vivo phones had sideloading vulnerabilities. ZTE had weaknesses in its message service and browser autofill. Other affected vendors included Meizu, chip maker MediaTek, Digitime,

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Rising Temperature Could Melt Antarctica ‘Irreversibly’, Warns New Study

KEY POINTS

  • Researchers say melting Antarctic ice could raise sea level by 8 feet
  • Such a rise in sea levels would devastate coastal cities and cultural sites around the world
  • Study says the only solution is to bring the world’s temperature back to pre-industrial levels

Coastal cities and cultural sites around the world could soon be submerged in water if the melting of ice in Antarctica reaches an “irreversible” level. If global warming is allowed to continue unchecked, most of Antarctica will be gone forever, a new study warns.  

The melting of ice in Antarctica can make glaciers the size of Florida slide into the ocean, said Anders Levermann, a researcher at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany, and a co-author of the study. The team ran computer simulations to identify “where exactly and at which warming levels the ice in Antarctica would melt.”  

“We find that

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Pentagon Is Clinging to Aging Technologies, House Panel Warns

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan House panel said on Tuesday that artificial intelligence, quantum computing, space and biotechnology were “making traditional battlefields and boundaries increasingly irrelevant” — but that the Pentagon was clinging to aging weapons systems meant for a past era.

The panel’s report, called the “Future of Defense Task Force,” is one of many underway in Congress to grapple with the speed at which the Pentagon is adopting new technologies, often using the rising competition with China in an effort to spur the pace of change.

Most reach a similar conclusion: For all the talk of embracing new technologies, the politics of killing off old weapons systems is so forbidding — often because it involves closing factories or bases, and endangers military jobs in congressional districts — that the efforts falter.

The task force said it was concentrating on the next 30 to 50 years, and concluded that the

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Palantir’s ICE Contracts ‘Raise Human Rights Concerns’, Report Warns As Firm Prepares To Go Public

With Palantir Technologies Inc. prepared to go public this week through a direct listing on the New York Stock Exchange, Amnesty International has released a report condemning the data-mining firm over “human rights concerns” raised by its contracts with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency.

Titled Failing to Do Right: The Urgent Need for Palantir to Respect Human Rights, the report, which was released on Monday, concludes that Palantir is “failing to conduct human rights due diligence around its contracts with ICE,” a press release from Amnesty states.

As a result, the organization states, the company, which was co-founded by Peter Thiel, runs a “high risk” of “contributing to human rights violations of asylum-seekers and migrants through the ways

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