Windows 10 20H2: Here’s why you’ll need to upgrade

Microsoft’s second Windows 10 update of 2020 is about to launch. What’s in it for business and for IT administrators?

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This latest release looks to give enterprises a mix of new features and stability across all Windows platforms.

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October is here, and it’s time for the second 2020 release of Windows 10. As pioneered in 2019, this is a smaller release than the 2004 update, adding stability features and prioritising a longer support model than the consumer- and early adopter-focused update. With 30 months of servicing, the H2 builds have a closer fit with common enterprise support lifecycles.

That shift in Windows development models worked well in 2019 and looks set to perform similarly in 2020. Microsoft was justly criticised for delaying the 20H1 release for many PCs, including its flagship Surface hardware, while it worked out some compatibility issues, but that won’t be the case with 20H2,

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Windows 10: Microsoft fires shot at Apple with new principles for treating developers right

Microsoft’s latest move in its war on Apple’s App Store rules is a list of 10 principles outlining what the Redmond company will and won’t do to developers who publish apps for Windows 10 and distribute them on the Microsoft Store. 

Microsoft says it will not block competing app stores on Windows and will not block apps because of a developer’s business model, such as whether an app’s content is installed on a device or streamed from the cloud. 

Microsoft published the 10 principles a day after Congress released a damning report into anticompetitive practices at Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. The EU opened its investigation into Apple’s App Store rules this June.  

SEE: Top 10 iPad tips (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

“Apple’s monopoly power over software distribution to iOS devices has resulted in harms to competitors and competition, reducing quality and innovation among app developers, and increasing prices and reducing

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A New Windows 10 Setup Screen Wants To Know If You Use The PC For Schoolwork, Gaming Or Business



graphical user interface, application: A New Windows 10 Setup Screen Wants To Know If You Use The PC For Schoolwork, Gaming Or Business


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A New Windows 10 Setup Screen Wants To Know If You Use The PC For Schoolwork, Gaming Or Business

The thing is, everyone uses their PC or laptop differently. Microsoft believes having that information when a user is setting up their new Windows 10 laptop or PC will help customize the experience better. In what is a new setup screen for Windows 10 that us being tested, users will be asked what they will use the PC for. The larger bucket of use cases mentioned include Gaming, Family, Creativity, Schoolwork, Entertainment and Business. A user will have the option to select multiple scenarios from this, depending on what all they intend to do with their new computing device. This new start screen is rolling out with the Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 20231 that is now available for Windows Insiders in the Dev Channel.

Microsoft says

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Cisco security warning: Patch Webex Teams for Windows and surveillance camera now

Cisco has released security updates for high-severity security flaws affecting Webex Teams for Windows, its Identity Services Engine, and Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras. 

In this month’s first round of security updates from Cisco, the most serious vulnerability addressed is a remote code-execution (RCE) and denial-of-service (DoS) bug affecting its Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras.

The flaw, tracked as CVE-2020-3544, has a severity rating of 8.8 out of 10, on par with similar RCE and DoS flaws it disclosed in August affecting the Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras. 

SEE: Security Awareness and Training policy (TechRepublic Premium)

Both sets of vulnerabilities were reported by Qian Chen of Qihoo 360 Nirvan Team and both concern flaws in the Cisco Discovery Protocol, a Layer 2 or data link layer protocol in the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) networking model. 

Similarly, both are due to “missing checks when an IP camera processes

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Windows 10 Mobile (almost) supported Android apps

Microsoft Lumia 950 Windows 10 Mobile

The overwhelming majority of smartphones on the market today are powered by Android or iOS, but it wasn’t long ago that Microsoft was in the game with Windows Phone and Windows 10 Mobile.

Windows 10 Mobile was Microsoft’s last attempt to gain traction with a smartphone operating system. It offered a distinctive Live Tile interface, a desktop mode for external displays, and support for universal Windows apps.

Unfortunately, the Achilles Heel for Microsoft’s latest mobile OS continued to be a lack of apps compared to Android and iOS. This would be a significant contributing factor to the platform’s demise, but did you know that Microsoft was in the advanced stages of bringing Android app support to Windows 10 Mobile?

Project Astoria

Microsoft's Project Astoria initiative.

Microsoft initially developed multiple software “bridges” for Windows 10 Mobile, with the purpose of helping developers easily port their apps from legacy Windows, iOS, and Android. The first two

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How to turn on the camera on your Windows 10 computer, or troubleshoot if it won’t turn on



a screen shot of an open laptop computer sitting on top of a table: It's easy to turn on the camera on a Windows 10 computer. Crystal Cox/Business Insider


© Crystal Cox/Business Insider
It’s easy to turn on the camera on a Windows 10 computer. Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • You can turn on the camera on your Windows computer immediately using the built-in Camera app.
  • If the camera on your PC isn’t working, it might not be enabled, or might not be turned on.
  • If you’re using an external webcam, you might also need to install software or updates for it.
  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

When it’s working properly, Windows 10’s Camera app is extremely easy to use on both laptops and desktops. 

But sometimes the Camera might not work as expected. Here’s how to turn on your camera in Windows 10, and what to do if you run into any issues.

How to turn on your camera in Windows 10

1. Click the search bar or magnifying glass icon in the bottom-left corner of

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Windows 10 Is Adding a Task Manager Dedicated to Gaming

Windows 10 is adding a Task Manager widget within the Xbox Game Bar to help you manage your computer’s resources without leaving a game.As spotted by WindowsCentral, the new ‘Resources’ widget lets you monitor which programs are causing the most strain on your computer, assess why your in-game performance may be hitching and close programs quickly without tabbing out. You’ll also be able to see how much load there is on your CPU, RAM, DISK and GPU, much like the traditional Task Manager application. It’s a neat timesaver that means you won’t have to alt-tab or hit CTRL+ALT+DELETE so often to figure out your in-game issues.

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The Windows 10 Task Manager Bar in action.

You can get access to the feature right now by enrolling in the Game Bar – SDK Development app within the Xbox Insider Hub on Windows 10. The Xbox Insider Hub allows Windows and Xbox users

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Windows on Arm will support a lot more apps starting next month

Microsoft Edge Chromium Surface Pro X

  • Microsoft has announced that 64-bit app emulation is coming to Windows on Arm next month.
  • The feature will be offered to consumers in the Windows Insider program first.
  • It allows users to run more legacy 64-bit Windows apps, such as games and editing tools.

The first Windows on Arm laptops and convertibles were released in 2018, offering Windows 10 on power-efficient Arm chips rather than legacy x64 silicon from Intel and AMD. Microsoft used emulation to allow 32-bit legacy apps to still run on Windows on Arm, but 64-bit app emulation hasn’t been possible until now.

Now, the Redmond company has announced (h/t: XDA-Developers) that it will indeed bring 64-bit app emulation to Windows on Arm next month. The company says users in the Windows Insider program will get the feature first, so users at large can expect to get it some time thereafter.

This was one of the

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Microsoft touts Windows 10 on Arm advances, including 64-bit emulation

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Credit: Microsoft

It’s been a while since Microsoft officials talked up what’s happening with Windows 10 on Arm. But on September 30, Microsoft provided a bit of an update on some of the work that’s been happening with that platform.

Microsoft confirmed in a blog post on September 30 that Windows on Arm will be able to run x64 apps with x64 emulation. Windows Insiders will get this capability in test builds in November. The blog post doesn’t mention when this capability will be generally available.

Currently, Windows on Arm natively supports Arm apps, including ARM64 versions. But so far, only 32-bit Intel (x86) apps are supported in emulation. This lack of x64 emulation has limited the number of apps that can run on Windows on Arm devices, since apps that are 64-bit only haven’t been able to run on these devices. In May, there were hints Microsoft was making

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Source Code For Multiple Windows Operating Systems Publicly Leaks

Microsoft has had to contend with quite a number of major leaks over the last few years, including everything from parts of the Windows 10 source code in 2017 to a Bing app server that recently leaked multiple terabytes of GPS data and user searches for more than week. On top of all that, it appears that a ~43GB archive of Microsoft source code, including the Windows XP (with Service Pack 1) and Windows Server 2003 operating systems, has reportedly leaked, along with a array of older OSes, including a few versions of Windows CE and MS-DOS.

Both Windows XP SP1 and Windows Server 2003 have been EOL for quite some time now. Current estimates put Windows XP’s market share at about 1.26% (and falling). Windows Server 2003’s share among connected servers is even lower and is estimated to be approximately .57% as of today. The

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