Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

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Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

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Nasdaq Women in Technology: Niharika Sharma, Senior Software Engineer, Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab

Women in Tech: Niharika Sharma

Niharika Sharma is a Senior Software Engineer for Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab. She designs systems that gather, process and apply machine learning/natural language processing technologies on natural language data, generating valuable insights to support business decisions. Over the past years, she worked on Natural Language Generation (NLG) and Surveillance Automation for Nasdaq Advisory Services. We sat down with Niharika to learn more about how she got her start in computer science and how she approaches challenges in her career.

Can you describe your day-to-day as a senior software engineer at Nasdaq?

My day-to-day work involves collaborating with Data Scientists to solve problems, ideating business possibilities with product teams and working with Data/Software Engineers to transform ideas into solutions.

How did you become involved in the technology industry, and how has technology influenced your role?

My first exposure to Computer Science was a Logo programming class that I took as a

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Opinion: Jackie Waring: Ada’s science and technology legacy lives on for women

TODAY is Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).

Ada, the daughter of the poet Lord Byron and his mathematics-loving wife Annabella Milbanke, showed her gift for mathematics at an early age introducing many computer concepts in the 19th century. However, nearly 150 years since her death, Ada’s legacy reminds us of the work still to be done to create access to more females in STEM-related fields.

According to 2019 UK Government data, women make up 24% of the core-STEM workforce. While this figure is rising, albeit slowly, in some STEM sectors, it appears to be flat-lining in technology where females account for just 17% of the workforce.

Here in Scotland there are a number of other bodies seeking to address this gender imbalance, including the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE), an internationally renowned science-focused organisation currently run by

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Northwestern Mutual to Host First-of-its-Kind Virtual Women in Tech Conference | News

MILWAUKEE, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Northwestern Mutual today announced the company will host its first Women in Tech Conference on December 3. This virtual conference will gather top companies nationwide, women technologists, and their allies for a full-day event focused on professional development, empowerment and collaboration with the ultimate goal of fostering a more diverse and inclusive tech industry and community.

The free event will begin with an inspiring keynote from world-class athlete, fitness and wellness expert Laila Ali and will be followed by concurrent breakout sessions packed with diverse perspectives and industry insights on a range of topics, including DevOps, CICD (continuous integration/continuous design), innovation, cloud computing, event driven architecture, data and more. Networking opportunities to connect with other event attendees will be available throughout the day.

“Gender equity is important for our teams, businesses and society to thrive, and with technology at the center of

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WVSU president to speak at virtual Women & Technology Conference | Metro Kanawha

West Virginia State University President Dr. Nicole Pride will be the keynote speaker for the 2020 West Virginia Women & Technology Conference, to be offered online this year in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

South Charleston-based TechConnect West Virginia is hosting this year’s virtual conference, which is free to view online. It will begin at 9 a.m. and conclude at noon on Monday, Oct. 19.

As in years past, the 2020 webinar/conference will address the under-representation of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields and explore strategies for closing the gender gap in technology.

Pride started her career in the corporate and nonprofit sectors, moving later to the higher education field at North Carolina A&T State University. She was named the first female president at the Institute university in July and became the school’s 12th president in September.

A pair of panel discussions will follow Pride’s remarks.

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Why Covid could remove barriers for women in the car industry

Astrid Fontaine

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Astrid Fontaine thinks the changes forced on firms by Covid-19 could reap significant benefits

“When I went to university, we were three girls out of 120 students studying mechanical engineering,” says Dr Astrid Fontaine.

“Who do you have in a company that’s engineering driven? It’s people who have studied science, technology, maths, engineering – and these were subjects in the past that mainly boys tended to study.”

Dr Fontaine is a board member at Bentley, the Volkswagen-owned British luxury carmaker. She is trying to explain to me why senior female executives like her are still a relative rarity in the car industry, even though women make up an increasingly large proportion of the market – and in the UK alone own some 35% of the cars on the road.

She is also setting out why she thinks the crisis in the industry sparked by the Covid-19 pandemic may

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Two Demand Solutions Customers Honored with SDCE Women in Supply Chain Awards

Company Congratulates Andrea Gauntlett and Joanna George on Inclusion in First-Ever Awards

Demand Management, Inc., a leading global resource for cloud-based digital supply chain management solutions, announced today that its customers Joanna George, Director, Global Demand Planning & Processes, Siemens Healthineers, and Andrea Gauntlett, Director of Supply Chain at T-Y Groupe – Linen Holdings, LLC, have been included in the first-ever SDCE Women in Supply Chain Awards.

The Women in Supply Chain Awards honor female supply chain leaders and executives whose accomplishments, mentorship, and examples set a foundation for women in all levels of a company’s supply chain network. Supply & Demand Chain Executive launched this award in 2020 to honor its 20-year anniversary. The magazine accepted nominations from May to July 2020.

“We received over 200 entries for this new award, entries that were submitted from a combination of men and women. This proves that our industry needed an

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Creators of Gene ‘Scissors’ Clinch Nobel as Women Sweep Chemistry | World News

By Niklas Pollard, Douglas Busvine and Daniel Trotta

STOCKHOLM/BERLIN (Reuters) – Two scientists won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for creating genetic ‘scissors’ that can rewrite the code of life, contributing to new cancer therapies and holding out the prospect of curing hereditary diseases.

Emmanuelle Charpentier, who is French, and American Jennifer Doudna share the 10 million Swedish crown ($1.1 million) prize for developing the CRISPR/Cas9 tool to edit the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with precision.

“The ability to cut the DNA where you want has revolutionized the life sciences,” Pernilla Wittung Stafshede of the Swedish Academy of Sciences told an award ceremony.

Charpentier, 51, and Doudna, 56, become the sixth and seventh women to win a Nobel for chemistry, joining Marie Curie, who won in 1911, and more recently, Frances Arnold, in 2018.

It is the first time since 1964, when Britain’s Dorothy Crowfoot

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Indian Women In Science Struggled Even Before The Pandemic. Now, Things Are Much Worse

Rubina Mulchandani has been unable to do any field work for the past six months. A PhD scholar at the Indian Institute of Public Health in Gurugram, Mulchandani’s research involves travelling to tertiary hospitals in Delhi to collect data from cardiology OPDs. The first major hurdle was the Delhi metro grinding to a halt on 22 March, two days before the national lockdown began. Then came the other restrictions and health risks of the pandemic. While metro services restarted in September, Mulchandani, who has already lost precious time, says she’s unlikely to get on a train anytime soon because of the health and safety risks involved.

“Early research career fellows like me often do a lot of field work. There is only so much work you can do sitting at home. We are all facing that problem, but for women, due to the fact that we face additional constraints with

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