Feisty Tasmanian Devils Roaming Australian Mainland Again After 3,000 Years

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Tasmanian devils, the carnivorous marsupials whose feisty, frenzied eating habits won the animals cartoon fame, have returned to mainland Australia for the first time in some 3,000 years.

“Seeing those devils released into a wild landscape — it’s a really emotional moment,” said Liz Gabriel, director of conservation group Aussie Ark, which led the release effort in partnership with other conservation groups.

The 11 most recently released devils began exploring their new home once they were freed from round, white cages at the nearly 1,000-acre Barrington Tops wildlife refuge in New South Wales state, about 190 kilometers (120 miles) north of Sydney.

Tasmanian devils, which were once called Sarcophilus satanicus or “Satanic flesh-lover,” went extinct in mainland Australia before the arrival of Europeans. Scientists believe the introduction of carnivorous dingoes, a surge in the indigenous human population, and a devastating dry season cause by a prolonged

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Toothless, parrot-like dinosaur thrived 69 million years ago, study finds

Multiple skeletons of the Oksoko avarsan, a feathered omnivorous dinosaur that grew to 2 meters in length, were dug up in the Gobi Desert in Mongolia by researchers from the University of Edinburgh, according to a news statement published Tuesday.

It had a large, toothless beak like modern-day parrots and just two digits on each forearm — one less than its close relatives.

It’s the first time scientists have seen evidence of digit loss among oviraptors, a family of three-fingered dinosaurs.

Evolving to have fewer digits suggests they could also “alter their diets and lifestyles, and enabled them to diversify and multiply,” according to the statement.

The “very complete” juvenile skeletons were found resting together, showing that young Oksoko avarsan roamed in groups, said paleontologist Gregory Funston, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Edinburgh who led the study.

“But more importantly, its two-fingered hand prompted us to look at

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VMworld 2020: 4 Takeaways from This Year’s Event

3. Partnerships Can Ease the Burden in Times of Crisis

With so many procedures changing, IT departments have a lot to keep straight on their own. That’s where partnering up with an outside resource can be invaluable. 

Todd King, a VMware software-defined data center architect at CDW, said his company was able to help its customers immensely during the initial transition to remote work.

“In the beginning with COVID, we were dealing more with just enabling workers to work from home and enabling those IT staffs to be able to support all that,” King said. “Now, as we start to settle into this work-from-home idea, we’re actually starting to help customers understand security for working from home, understand data center infrastructure, and expanding on demand to address all these dynamic workforces and the needs of the business.”

Tom Cahill, vice president for product and partner management at CDW, said those

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Chris Hemsworth helps reintroduce Tasmanian devils to Australia for first time in 3,000 years

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Actors Chris Hemsworth and Elsa Pataky worked with wildlife conservation group Aussie Ark to help release a group of Tasmanian devils on Australia’s mainland. 


Aussie Ark

Marvel actor Chris Hemsworth joined conservationists at Aussie Ark for a historic moment in his homeland of Australia, where they reintroduced the Tasmanian devil to the mainland for the first time in an estimated 3,000 years.

Leave it to Thor to help bring back Tasmanian devils to Australia. 

Hemsworth and his wife and actress Elsa Pataky helped release a group of 11 Tasmanian devils into a 1,000-acre wildlife sanctuary at Barrington Tops National Park in New South Wales on Sept. 10, as part of a crucial effort to restore the endangered species to its former habitat. 

“We laid some traps to catch

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Cargo carriers warn that getting a COVID-19 vaccine to everyone on Earth could take up to two years



a large passenger jet sitting on top of a runway: Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com


© vaalaa/Shutterstock.com
Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com

  • Even if a coronavirus vaccine is approved soon, it will likely be years until it can be distributed around the world, according to cargo airline and logistics executives.
  • Challenging storage and shipping requirements, combined with reduced cargo availability and higher demand, are likely to delay distribution, according to a new Wall Street Journal report.
  • Although cargo airlines are trying to prepare, a host of unknowns — including where the vaccine will be made, how many doses are needed, and how it will need to be stored — means there’s only so much that can be organized in advance.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Even if a COVID-19 vaccine can be developed, approved, and mass produced quickly, getting it to countries and communities around the world

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Look up Tuesday night! Mars hasn’t been this bright in October in over 30 years

Look up Tuesday night! Mars hasn't been this bright in October in over 30 years
Look up Tuesday night! Mars hasn’t been this bright in October in over 30 years

Mars has been growing brighter in the night sky throughout the year so far. On Tuesday night, the planet will be at the brightest we’ve seen it in October in 32 years.

According to NASA, on October 6, 2020, Mars will be 62.1 million kilometres away from Earth. That’s the closest it’s come to us since July and August of 2018, when it reached a distance of 57.6 million km on July 31.

21868 Mars 2018-2020 revised metric NASA
21868 Mars 2018-2020 revised metric NASA

Mars was just 57.6 million km from Earth on July 31, 2018, the closest since 2003. By August 21, 2018, it was farther away than it is now, in October 2020. Credit: NASA/Scott Sutherland

According to NASA, Mars came even closer to Earth in 2003 – 55.7 million km on August 27 – which was the

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Early Humans Were Using Fire 300,000 Years Ago to Forge Superior Stone Tools

A stone tool made of flint.

A stone tool made of flint.
Image: Avraham Gopher

The prehistoric practice of using controlled fires to produce customized stone tools dates back 300,000 years, according to new research. The discovery affirms the cognitive and cultural sophistication of human species living at this time.

The baked flint tools, found at Qesem Cave in central Israel, are evidence that early hominins were capable of controlling the temperature of their fires and that they had stumbled upon an important survival skill, according to new research published today in Nature Human Behavior.

The heating of flint at low temperatures allowed for better control of flaking during knapping. Armed with this level of control, tool builders could cater their tools for specific cutting applications. The new paper was led by archaeologist Filipe Natalio from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel.

Silje Evjenth Bentsen, an anthropologist at the University of Bergen who

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Tasmanian devils reintroduced to mainland Australia after 3,000 years

The carnivorous marsupials have been released into a 400-hectare (988-acre) wildlife sanctuary north of Sydney, New South Wales, Australian NGO Aussie Ark said in a statement.

“In 100 years, we are going to be looking back at this day as the day that set in motion the ecological restoration of an entire country,” said Tim Faulkner, president of Aussie Ark.

“Not only is this the reintroduction of one of Australia’s beloved animals, but of an animal that will engineer the entire environment around it, restoring and rebalancing our forest ecology after centuries of devastation from introduced foxes and cats and other invasive predators.”

Tasmanian devils died out on the mainland after the arrival of dingoes and were restricted to the island of Tasmania. However, their numbers suffered another blow from a contagious form of cancer known as Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD), which has killed around 90% of the population
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Tasmanian devils return to mainland Australia for first time in 3,000 years

It’s been 3,000 years since the Tasmanian devil’s raspy shriek rang through the forests of mainland Australia. But now, thanks to a dogged reintroduction effort, 26 of these endangered tiny terrors have returned.

No bigger than a lapdog, these marsupials are famous for their ferocity and powerful jaws, which can reduce large carcasses to smithereens in minutes. But in the 1990s, the species was hit with a contagious and deadly mouth cancer, causing its only remaining wild population, on the Australian island state of Tasmania, to drop to just 25,000 animals.

It’s unknown why the species disappeared from Australia millennia ago, but it’s likely due to human actions—when early hunters killed off most of the continent’s megafauna, the devils had nothing left to eat.

As scavengers, devils play a crucial role in maintaining a balanced, healthy ecosystem—which is why scientists have been trying so hard to bring them back.

“We’ve

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In major discovery, 59 ancient coffins, closed for more than 2,600 years, revealed in Egypt

Officials in Egypt have revealed 59 ancient coffins that were discovered south of Cairo.

The coffins were excavated at the ancient pyramid site of Saqqara.

At a news conference, Egypt’s Tourism and Antiquities Minister Khalid el-Anany said at least 59 sealed sarcophagi, with mummies inside most of them, were found. The coffins had been buried in three wells more than 2,600 years ago.

13 COFFINS, CLOSED FOR 2,500-YEARS, DISCOVERED IN EGYPT

Initially, 13 coffins were found, although archaeologists subsequently excavated others. The coffins are in a good state of preservation and maintain their original colors, according to Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, in a translated Facebook post on Saturday.

Ancient coffins are displayed at the Saqqara archaeological site, 19 miles south of Cairo, Egypt on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020.

Ancient coffins are displayed at the Saqqara archaeological site, 19 miles south of Cairo, Egypt on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020.
(AP Photo/Mahmoud Khaled)

The coffins are thought to contain the remains of priests, ancient state officials, and other prominent people.

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